Developmental biology: Frontiers for clinical genetics. Human enbryo and early fetus research

Harry Ostrer, D. I. Wilson, N. A. Hanley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies of human embryos and fetuses have highlighted developmental differences between humans and model organisms. In addition to describing the normal biology of our own species, a justification in itself, studies of early human development have aided identification of candidate disease genes mapped by positional cloning strategies, understanding pathophysiology, where human disorders are not faithfully reproduced by models in other species, and, more recently, potential therapies based on human embryonic stem and embryonic germ cells. In this article, we review these applications. We also discuss when and how to study human embryo and early fetuses and some of the regulations of this research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)98-107
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Genetics
Volume70
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Developmental Biology
Fetus
Research
Embryonic Structures
Genetic Association Studies
Human Development
Organism Cloning

Keywords

  • Differentiation
  • Embryology
  • Embryonic germ cell
  • Embryonic stem cell
  • Fetus
  • Human development
  • Human embryo

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Genetics

Cite this

Developmental biology : Frontiers for clinical genetics. Human enbryo and early fetus research. / Ostrer, Harry; Wilson, D. I.; Hanley, N. A.

In: Clinical Genetics, Vol. 70, No. 2, 08.2006, p. 98-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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