Detection of human βV-tubulin expression in epithelial cancer cell lines by tubulin proteomics

Pascal Verdier-Pinard, Shohreh Shahabi, Fang Wang, Berta Burd, Hui Xiao, Gary L. Goldberg, George A. Orr, Susan Band Horwitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tubulin, the constitutive protein of microtubules, is a heterodimeric protein with an α and β subunit, encoded in vertebrates by six and seven different genes, respectively. Each tubulin isotype can be identified by its divergent C-terminal sequence. Nevertheless, two groups of β-tubulin isotypes can be distinguished by sequence alignment; one includes βI-, βII-, βIVa-, and βIVb-tubulin, and the other includes βIII-, βV-, and βVI-tubulin. βIII-tubulin overexpression has been associated with microtubule destabilization and resistance to Taxol. Recent data indicate that mouse βV-tubulin overexpression in CHO cells results in profound microtubule disorganization and dependence of cells on Taxol for growth. Mouse and human βV-tubulin sequences display several differences, such as their respective extreme C-terminus, suggesting that they may have different effects on microtubule stability and different affinities for drugs. When high-resolution isoelectric focusing, in-gel CNBr cleavage, and mass spectrometry were combined, we detected for the first time the βV-tubulin protein in human cell lines and found that it was highly expressed in Hey, an epithelial ovarian cancer cell line. Our data confirm that human and rodent βV-tubulins are distinct and indicate that, regardless of species, βIII- and βV-tubulin may be expressed in a complementary pattern at the protein level. Therefore, both βIII- and βV-tubulin expression levels should be systematically determined to assess the role of differential tubulin isotype expression in the response of tumors to drugs targeting microtubules.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15858-15870
Number of pages13
JournalBiochemistry
Volume44
Issue number48
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 6 2005

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Tubulin
Proteomics
Epithelial Cells
Cells
Cell Line
Neoplasms
Microtubules
Paclitaxel
Microtubule Proteins
Proteins
CHO Cells
Sequence Alignment
Protein Subunits
Isoelectric Focusing
Drug Delivery Systems
Mass spectrometry
Vertebrates
Tumors
Rodentia
Mass Spectrometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Verdier-Pinard, P., Shahabi, S., Wang, F., Burd, B., Xiao, H., Goldberg, G. L., ... Band Horwitz, S. (2005). Detection of human βV-tubulin expression in epithelial cancer cell lines by tubulin proteomics. Biochemistry, 44(48), 15858-15870. https://doi.org/10.1021/bi051004p

Detection of human βV-tubulin expression in epithelial cancer cell lines by tubulin proteomics. / Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Shahabi, Shohreh; Wang, Fang; Burd, Berta; Xiao, Hui; Goldberg, Gary L.; Orr, George A.; Band Horwitz, Susan.

In: Biochemistry, Vol. 44, No. 48, 06.12.2005, p. 15858-15870.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Verdier-Pinard, P, Shahabi, S, Wang, F, Burd, B, Xiao, H, Goldberg, GL, Orr, GA & Band Horwitz, S 2005, 'Detection of human βV-tubulin expression in epithelial cancer cell lines by tubulin proteomics', Biochemistry, vol. 44, no. 48, pp. 15858-15870. https://doi.org/10.1021/bi051004p
Verdier-Pinard P, Shahabi S, Wang F, Burd B, Xiao H, Goldberg GL et al. Detection of human βV-tubulin expression in epithelial cancer cell lines by tubulin proteomics. Biochemistry. 2005 Dec 6;44(48):15858-15870. https://doi.org/10.1021/bi051004p
Verdier-Pinard, Pascal ; Shahabi, Shohreh ; Wang, Fang ; Burd, Berta ; Xiao, Hui ; Goldberg, Gary L. ; Orr, George A. ; Band Horwitz, Susan. / Detection of human βV-tubulin expression in epithelial cancer cell lines by tubulin proteomics. In: Biochemistry. 2005 ; Vol. 44, No. 48. pp. 15858-15870.
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