Dermatologic Manifestations of Diabetes Mellitus. A Review.

Blair Murphy-Chutorian, George Han, Steven R. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus affects every organ of the body including the skin. Certain skin manifestations of diabetes are considered cutaneous markers of the disease, whereas others are nonspecific conditions that occur more frequently among individuals with diabetes compared with the general population. Diabetic patients have an increased susceptibility to some bacterial and fungal skin infections, which account, in part, for poor healing. Skin complications of diabetes provide clues to current and past metabolic status. Recognition of cutaneous markers may slow disease progression and ultimately improve the overall prognosis by enabling earlier diagnosis and treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)869-898
Number of pages30
JournalEndocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Diabetes Mellitus
Skin
Skin Manifestations
Mycoses
Diabetes Complications
Skin Diseases
Disease Progression
Early Diagnosis
Population
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Acanthosis nigricans
  • Bullosa diabeticorum
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Diabetic scleredema
  • Granuloma annulare
  • Necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum
  • Periungual erythema
  • Yellow skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Dermatologic Manifestations of Diabetes Mellitus. A Review. / Murphy-Chutorian, Blair; Han, George; Cohen, Steven R.

In: Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America, Vol. 42, No. 4, 12.2013, p. 869-898.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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