Delayed Radionucleotide Gastric Emptying Studies Predict Morbidity in Diabetics With Symptoms of Gastroparesis

Brian Hyett, Fernando J. Martinez, Brian M. Gill, Shilpa Mehra, Anthony Lembo, Ciaran P. Kelly, Daniel A. Leffler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background & Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of gastric emptying studies on the morbidity associated with diabetic gastroparesis. Methods: This was a parallel cohort study of 3 groups. Group A (n = 94) contained diabetic patients (type 1 and type 2) with classic symptoms of gastroparesis (including early satiety, postprandial fullness, bloating, abdominal swelling, nausea, vomiting, and retching) and delay in radionucleotide gastric emptying study. Group B (n = 94) contained diabetic subjects with classic symptoms of gastroparesis but negative scintigraphy. Group C (n = 94) contained diabetic subjects without symptoms of gastroparesis. Data were gathered on the number of days hospitalized and hospitalizations, office visits, emergency department visits, death rate, glycosylated hemoglobin levels, medications, and past medical history. Results: Group A had significantly more hospital days per 1000 patient days (25.5) than both group B (5.1; P < .01) and group C (2.3; P < .01). Group A also had significantly more hospitalizations, office visits, and emergency department visits than both group B and group C. Deaths and mean glycosylated hemoglobin levels did not differ between the groups. Patients in group A were more likely to have cardiovascular disease (19.2% vs 6.4%, A vs C; P < .05), hypertension (63% vs 43%, A vs C; P = .005), and retinopathy (33% vs 11.7%, A vs C; P < .001). Conclusions: A delayed radionucleotide gastric emptying study predicts negative health outcomes in diabetic patients with symptoms of gastroparesis. We identified a correlation between diabetic gastroparesis and cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and retinopathy that may indicate an underlying vascular etiology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-452
Number of pages8
JournalGastroenterology
Volume137
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Gastroparesis
Gastric Emptying
Morbidity
Office Visits
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
Cardiovascular Diseases
Hypertension
Radionuclide Imaging
Nausea
Vomiting
Blood Vessels
Cohort Studies
Mortality
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Delayed Radionucleotide Gastric Emptying Studies Predict Morbidity in Diabetics With Symptoms of Gastroparesis. / Hyett, Brian; Martinez, Fernando J.; Gill, Brian M.; Mehra, Shilpa; Lembo, Anthony; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Leffler, Daniel A.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 137, No. 2, 08.2009, p. 445-452.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hyett, Brian ; Martinez, Fernando J. ; Gill, Brian M. ; Mehra, Shilpa ; Lembo, Anthony ; Kelly, Ciaran P. ; Leffler, Daniel A. / Delayed Radionucleotide Gastric Emptying Studies Predict Morbidity in Diabetics With Symptoms of Gastroparesis. In: Gastroenterology. 2009 ; Vol. 137, No. 2. pp. 445-452.
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abstract = "Background & Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of gastric emptying studies on the morbidity associated with diabetic gastroparesis. Methods: This was a parallel cohort study of 3 groups. Group A (n = 94) contained diabetic patients (type 1 and type 2) with classic symptoms of gastroparesis (including early satiety, postprandial fullness, bloating, abdominal swelling, nausea, vomiting, and retching) and delay in radionucleotide gastric emptying study. Group B (n = 94) contained diabetic subjects with classic symptoms of gastroparesis but negative scintigraphy. Group C (n = 94) contained diabetic subjects without symptoms of gastroparesis. Data were gathered on the number of days hospitalized and hospitalizations, office visits, emergency department visits, death rate, glycosylated hemoglobin levels, medications, and past medical history. Results: Group A had significantly more hospital days per 1000 patient days (25.5) than both group B (5.1; P < .01) and group C (2.3; P < .01). Group A also had significantly more hospitalizations, office visits, and emergency department visits than both group B and group C. Deaths and mean glycosylated hemoglobin levels did not differ between the groups. Patients in group A were more likely to have cardiovascular disease (19.2{\%} vs 6.4{\%}, A vs C; P < .05), hypertension (63{\%} vs 43{\%}, A vs C; P = .005), and retinopathy (33{\%} vs 11.7{\%}, A vs C; P < .001). Conclusions: A delayed radionucleotide gastric emptying study predicts negative health outcomes in diabetic patients with symptoms of gastroparesis. We identified a correlation between diabetic gastroparesis and cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and retinopathy that may indicate an underlying vascular etiology.",
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AU - Lembo, Anthony

AU - Kelly, Ciaran P.

AU - Leffler, Daniel A.

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N2 - Background & Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of gastric emptying studies on the morbidity associated with diabetic gastroparesis. Methods: This was a parallel cohort study of 3 groups. Group A (n = 94) contained diabetic patients (type 1 and type 2) with classic symptoms of gastroparesis (including early satiety, postprandial fullness, bloating, abdominal swelling, nausea, vomiting, and retching) and delay in radionucleotide gastric emptying study. Group B (n = 94) contained diabetic subjects with classic symptoms of gastroparesis but negative scintigraphy. Group C (n = 94) contained diabetic subjects without symptoms of gastroparesis. Data were gathered on the number of days hospitalized and hospitalizations, office visits, emergency department visits, death rate, glycosylated hemoglobin levels, medications, and past medical history. Results: Group A had significantly more hospital days per 1000 patient days (25.5) than both group B (5.1; P < .01) and group C (2.3; P < .01). Group A also had significantly more hospitalizations, office visits, and emergency department visits than both group B and group C. Deaths and mean glycosylated hemoglobin levels did not differ between the groups. Patients in group A were more likely to have cardiovascular disease (19.2% vs 6.4%, A vs C; P < .05), hypertension (63% vs 43%, A vs C; P = .005), and retinopathy (33% vs 11.7%, A vs C; P < .001). Conclusions: A delayed radionucleotide gastric emptying study predicts negative health outcomes in diabetic patients with symptoms of gastroparesis. We identified a correlation between diabetic gastroparesis and cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and retinopathy that may indicate an underlying vascular etiology.

AB - Background & Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of gastric emptying studies on the morbidity associated with diabetic gastroparesis. Methods: This was a parallel cohort study of 3 groups. Group A (n = 94) contained diabetic patients (type 1 and type 2) with classic symptoms of gastroparesis (including early satiety, postprandial fullness, bloating, abdominal swelling, nausea, vomiting, and retching) and delay in radionucleotide gastric emptying study. Group B (n = 94) contained diabetic subjects with classic symptoms of gastroparesis but negative scintigraphy. Group C (n = 94) contained diabetic subjects without symptoms of gastroparesis. Data were gathered on the number of days hospitalized and hospitalizations, office visits, emergency department visits, death rate, glycosylated hemoglobin levels, medications, and past medical history. Results: Group A had significantly more hospital days per 1000 patient days (25.5) than both group B (5.1; P < .01) and group C (2.3; P < .01). Group A also had significantly more hospitalizations, office visits, and emergency department visits than both group B and group C. Deaths and mean glycosylated hemoglobin levels did not differ between the groups. Patients in group A were more likely to have cardiovascular disease (19.2% vs 6.4%, A vs C; P < .05), hypertension (63% vs 43%, A vs C; P = .005), and retinopathy (33% vs 11.7%, A vs C; P < .001). Conclusions: A delayed radionucleotide gastric emptying study predicts negative health outcomes in diabetic patients with symptoms of gastroparesis. We identified a correlation between diabetic gastroparesis and cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and retinopathy that may indicate an underlying vascular etiology.

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