Delayed gut microbiota development in high-risk for asthma infants is temporarily modifiable by Lactobacillus supplementation

Juliana Durack, Nikole E. Kimes, Din L. Lin, Marcus Rauch, Michelle McKean, Kathryn McCauley, Ariane R. Panzer, Jordan S. Mar, Michael D. Cabana, Susan V. Lynch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Gut microbiota dysbiosis and metabolic dysfunction in infancy precedes childhood atopy and asthma development. Here we examined gut microbiota maturation over the first year of life in infants at high risk for asthma (HR), and whether it is modifiable by early-life Lactobacillus supplementation. We performed a longitudinal comparison of stool samples collected from HR infants randomized to daily oral Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (HRLGG) or placebo (HRP) for 6 months, and healthy (HC) infants. Meconium microbiota of HRP participants is distinct, follows a delayed developmental trajectory, and is primarily glycolytic and depleted of a range of anti-inflammatory lipids at 6 months of age. These deficits are partly rescued in HRLGG infants, but this effect was lost at 12 months of age, 6 months after cessation of supplementation. Thus we show that early-life gut microbial development is distinct, but plastic, in HR infants. Our findings offer a novel strategy for early-life preventative interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number707
JournalNature communications
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

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digestive system
probiotics
asthma
age structure
maturation
risk assessment
microorganism
bacterium
plastic
lipid
trajectory
infant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Delayed gut microbiota development in high-risk for asthma infants is temporarily modifiable by Lactobacillus supplementation. / Durack, Juliana; Kimes, Nikole E.; Lin, Din L.; Rauch, Marcus; McKean, Michelle; McCauley, Kathryn; Panzer, Ariane R.; Mar, Jordan S.; Cabana, Michael D.; Lynch, Susan V.

In: Nature communications, Vol. 9, No. 1, 707, 01.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Durack, Juliana ; Kimes, Nikole E. ; Lin, Din L. ; Rauch, Marcus ; McKean, Michelle ; McCauley, Kathryn ; Panzer, Ariane R. ; Mar, Jordan S. ; Cabana, Michael D. ; Lynch, Susan V. / Delayed gut microbiota development in high-risk for asthma infants is temporarily modifiable by Lactobacillus supplementation. In: Nature communications. 2018 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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