Degradation of arouser by endosomal microautophagy is essential for adaptation to starvation in Drosophila

Anne Claire Jacomin, Raksha Gohel, Zunoon Hussain, Agnes Varga, Tamas Maruzs, Mark Eddison, Margaux Sica, Ashish Jain, Kevin G. Moffat, Terje Johansen, Andreas Jenny, Gabor Juhasz, Ioannis P. Nezis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hunger drives food-seeking behaviour and controls adaptation of organisms to nutrient availability and energy stores. Lipids constitute an essential source of energy in the cell that can be mobilised during fasting by autophagy. Selective degradation of proteins by autophagy is made possible essentially by the presence of LIR and KFERQ-like motifs. Using in silico screening of Drosophila proteins that contain KFERQ-like motifs, we identified and characterized the adaptor protein Arouser, which functions to regulate fat storage and mobilisation and is essential during periods of food deprivation. We show that hypomorphic arouser mutants are not satiated, are more sensitive to food deprivation, and are more aggressive, suggesting an essential role for Arouser in the coordination of metabolism and food-related behaviour. Our analysis shows that Arouser functions in the fat body through nutrient-related signalling pathways and is degraded by endosomal microautophagy. Arouser degradation occurs during feeding conditions, whereas its stabilisation during non-feeding periods is essential for resistance to starvation and survival. In summary, our data describe a novel role for endosomal microautophagy in energy homeostasis, by the degradation of the signalling regulatory protein Arouser.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalLife Science Alliance
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)
  • Plant Science
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Degradation of arouser by endosomal microautophagy is essential for adaptation to starvation in Drosophila'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this