Deep prepiriform cortex kindling and amygdala interactions

Dayao Y. Zhao, Solomon L. Moshé

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The deep prepiriform cortex (DPC) has been recently suggested to be a crucial epileptogenic site in the rat brain. We investigated the susceptibility of the DPC to the development of electrical kindling as compared to that of the superficial prepiriform cortex (SPC) and amygdala as well as the transfer interactions between the two prepiriform sites and amygdala. Adult rats with electrodes implanted in the right prepiriform cortex (DPC or SPC) and left amygdala were divided into a DPC-amygdaia and SPC-amygdala group while a third group consisted of rats with electrodes implanted in the ipsilateral DPC and amygdala. Within each group the rats were initially kindled from one site selected randomly and then rekindled from the other site. Both DPC and SPC were as sensitive to the development of kindling as the amygdala. The behavioral seizures elicited with DPC or SPC primary kindling were identical to those induced by amygdala kindling. Initial DPC kindling facilitated the development of kindling from either ipsilateral or contralateral amygdala with the ipsilateral transfer being significantly more potent than the contralateral. SPC kindling also facilitated the development of contralateral amygdala kindling but was less effective than DPC kindling. On the other hand, amygdala kindling did not facilitate contralateral SPC or DPC kindling although it transferred to the ipsilateral DPC. These results indicate that the prepiriform cortex can be readily kindled but not faster than the amygdala and that there are unequal kindling transfer interactions between prepiriform cortex and amygdala.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-101
Number of pages8
JournalEpilepsy Research
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1987

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Keywords

  • Amygdala
  • Convulsions
  • Kindling
  • Prepiriform cortex
  • Rat
  • Seizures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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