Decadelong profile of women in ophthalmic publications

Valentina Franco-Cardenas, Jamie Rosenberg, Adriana Ramirez, Juan Lin, Irena Tsui

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

IMPORTANCE: In recent decades, there has been an increase in the number of women practicing medicine. We believe this shift may be reaching academic publications in ophthalmology and changing gender trends. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there has been an increase in women publishing academic articles and editorials in ophthalmology during the past decade. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In this observational retrospective study, 3 ophthalmology journals were sampled from 2000 and 2010 for at least 100 articles per journal, per year, and all editorials published in both years. Data reviewed included the authors' gender, number of authors, number of references, subspecialty, and country of origin. EXPOSURE: Publication by women authors. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome measurewas an increase inwomen publishing in ophthalmology. The hypothesis was formulated before data collection. RESULTS: Our analysis included 671 original articles (336 from 2000 and 335 from 2010) and 89 editorials. The percentage of original articles with a woman as first author increased from 23.2%in 2000 to 32.5%in 2010, a difference of 9.3%(95%CI, 23.3%-32.5%; P = .005). The percentage of original articles with a woman last author increased from 16.4%in 2000 to 24.2%in 2010, a difference of 7.8%(95%CI, 16.4%-24.2%; P = .01). The percentage of original articles with a woman first author increased in Asia from 1.2%in 2000 to 8.4% in 2010, a difference of 7.2%(95%CI, 1.2%-8.4%; P < .001). The percentage of articles with a woman last author increased in Europe from 2.2%in 2000 to 7.5%in 2010, a difference of 5.3%(95%CI, 2.2%-7.5%; P < .001) and in Asia from 0% in 2000 to 6.0% in 2010, a difference of 6.0% (95%CI, 0%-6%; P < .001). Editorials were written predominantly by men: 33 of 38 editorials (87%) in 2000 and 46 of 51 (90%) in 2010, a difference of 3%(95% CI, 87%-90%; P = .62), showing a trend toward decreased editorial authorship by women during the past decade. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Our data suggest an increase in women publishing original investigations in ophthalmic literature, but no increase in editorial authorship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)255-259
Number of pages5
JournalJAMA Ophthalmology
Volume133
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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