Daily coffee consumption and prevalence of nonmelanoma skin cancer in Caucasian women

Ernest L. Abel, Susan O. Hendrix, S. Gene McNeeley, Karen C. Johnson, Carol A. Rosenberg, Yasmin Mossavar-Rahmani, Mara Vitolins, Michael Kruger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

49 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between daily coffee consumption and nonmelanoma skin cancer. This study was a cross-sectional analysis of women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (n=93 676). As nearly all cases of self-reported nonmelanoma skin cancer occurred among Caucasian women (97.8%), we focused our analyses on this group. Compared with nondrinkers, women drinking only caffeinated coffee on a daily basis had a 10.8% lower prevalence of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Consumption of six or more cups of caffeinated coffee per day was associated with a 36% reduction in nonmelanoma skin cancer. After adjusting for various demographic and life style variables, daily consumption of six or more cups was associated with a 30% reduced prevalence of nonmelanoma skin cancer. In contrast to caffeinated coffee, daily consumption of decaffeinated coffee was not associated with a significant change in self-reported nonmelanoma skin cancer for Caucasian women. Daily caffeinated coffee consumption was associated with a dose-related decreased prevalence of nonmelanoma skin cancer in Caucasian women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)446-452
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer Prevention
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007

Keywords

  • Coffee
  • Menopause
  • Nonmelanoma skin cancer
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Cancer Research

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