Crucial role of the central leptin receptor in murine Trypanosoma cruzi (Brazil strain) infection

Fnu Nagajyothi, Dazhi Zhao, Fabiana S. Machado, Louis M. Weiss, Gary J. Schwartz, Mahalia S. Desruisseaux, Yang Zhao, Stephen M. Factor, Huan Huang, Chris Albanese, Mauro M. Teixeira, Philipp E. Scherer, Streamson C. Chua, Jr., Herbert B. Tanowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mice carrying a defective leptin receptor gene (db/db mice) are metabolically challenged and upon infection with Trypanosoma cruzi (Brazil strain) suffer high mortality. In genetically modified db/db mice, (NSE-Rb db/ db mice), central leptin signaling is reconstituted only in the brain, which is sufficient to correct the metabolic defects. NSE-Rb db/db mice were infected with T. cruzi to determine the impact of the lack of leptin signaling on infection in the absence of metabolic dysregulation. Parasitemia levels, mortality rates, and tissue parasitism were statistically significantly increased in infected db/db mice compared with those in infected NSE-Rb db/ db and FVB wild-type mice. There was a reduction in fat mass and blood glucose level in infected db/db mice. Plasma levels of several cytokines and chemokines were statistically significantly increased in infected db/db mice compared with those in infected FVB and NSE-Rb db/db mice. These findings suggest that leptin resistance in individuals with obesity and diabetes mellitus may have adverse consequences in T. cruzi infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1104-1113
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume202
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010

Fingerprint

Leptin Receptors
Trypanosoma cruzi
Brazil
Infection
Leptin
Parasitemia
Mortality
Chemokines
Blood Glucose
Diabetes Mellitus
Obesity
Fats
Cytokines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Crucial role of the central leptin receptor in murine Trypanosoma cruzi (Brazil strain) infection. / Nagajyothi, Fnu; Zhao, Dazhi; Machado, Fabiana S.; Weiss, Louis M.; Schwartz, Gary J.; Desruisseaux, Mahalia S.; Zhao, Yang; Factor, Stephen M.; Huang, Huan; Albanese, Chris; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Chua, Jr., Streamson C.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 202, No. 7, 01.10.2010, p. 1104-1113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nagajyothi, F, Zhao, D, Machado, FS, Weiss, LM, Schwartz, GJ, Desruisseaux, MS, Zhao, Y, Factor, SM, Huang, H, Albanese, C, Teixeira, MM, Scherer, PE, Chua, Jr., SC & Tanowitz, HB 2010, 'Crucial role of the central leptin receptor in murine Trypanosoma cruzi (Brazil strain) infection', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 202, no. 7, pp. 1104-1113. https://doi.org/10.1086/656189
Nagajyothi, Fnu ; Zhao, Dazhi ; Machado, Fabiana S. ; Weiss, Louis M. ; Schwartz, Gary J. ; Desruisseaux, Mahalia S. ; Zhao, Yang ; Factor, Stephen M. ; Huang, Huan ; Albanese, Chris ; Teixeira, Mauro M. ; Scherer, Philipp E. ; Chua, Jr., Streamson C. ; Tanowitz, Herbert B. / Crucial role of the central leptin receptor in murine Trypanosoma cruzi (Brazil strain) infection. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2010 ; Vol. 202, No. 7. pp. 1104-1113.
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