Cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships among age, cognition, and processing speed

Martin Sliwinski, Herman Buschke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

151 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cross-sectional and longitudinal age effects on cognitive function were examined in 302 older adults followed longitudinally. Processing speed was related to cognitive performance at cross-section, and change in speed predicted within-person longitudinal cognitive decline. Statistical control of processing speed greatly reduced cross-sectional age effects but did not attenuate longitudinal aging effects. This difference in processing speed's ability to account for cross-sectional and longitudinal age effects is discussed in the context of theories of cognitive and methodological statistical issues pertaining to the cross-sectional and longitudinal study of cognitive aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-33
Number of pages16
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Aptitude
Cognition
Longitudinal Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cognitive Dysfunction
Cognitive Aging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships among age, cognition, and processing speed. / Sliwinski, Martin; Buschke, Herman.

In: Psychology and Aging, Vol. 14, No. 1, 03.1999, p. 18-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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