Counseling on sun protection and indoor tanning

Sophie J. Balk, Elizabeth A. Gottschlich, Dawn M. Holman, Meg Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends clinical counseling for individuals ages 10 to 24 years to decrease skin cancer risk. METHODS: A national, random sample of US American Academy of Pediatrics members practicing primary care in 2002 (response rate 55%) and 2015 (response rate 43%). Surveys explored attitudes and experiences regarding sun protection counseling; indoor tanning questions were added in 2015. ?2 tests compared demographics and counseling responses across years, and multivariable logistic regression models examined counseling predictors. RESULTS: More pediatricians in 2015 (34%) than in 2002 (23%) reported discussing sun protection during recent summer months with ≥75% of patients. This pattern held across all patient age groups (each P <.001). Female and suburban pediatricians counseled more; those in the South and West counseled less. More pediatricians in 2015 than in 2002 named time as a barrier. Sun protection ranked lowest among preventive topics in both years. In 2015, approximately one-third of pediatricians reported discussing indoor tanning at least once with 10 to 13 year-old patients; approximately half discussed this with older adolescents. Most (70%) did not know if their states had laws on minors' indoor tanning access; those stating they knew whether a law existed counseled more. CONCLUSIONS: Although improved, sun protection counseling rates remain low. Indoor tanning counseling can be improved. Because early-life exposure to UV radiation increases risk and clinician counseling can positively impact prevention behaviors, pediatricians have an important role in skin cancer prevention; counseling may save lives. Time constraints remain a barrier.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere20171680
JournalPediatrics
Volume140
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Tanning
Solar System
Counseling
Skin Neoplasms
Logistic Models
Minors
Advisory Committees
Primary Health Care
Age Groups
Demography
Pediatricians
Radiation
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Balk, S. J., Gottschlich, E. A., Holman, D. M., & Watson, M. (2017). Counseling on sun protection and indoor tanning. Pediatrics, 140(6), [e20171680]. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-1680

Counseling on sun protection and indoor tanning. / Balk, Sophie J.; Gottschlich, Elizabeth A.; Holman, Dawn M.; Watson, Meg.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 140, No. 6, e20171680, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Balk, SJ, Gottschlich, EA, Holman, DM & Watson, M 2017, 'Counseling on sun protection and indoor tanning', Pediatrics, vol. 140, no. 6, e20171680. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-1680
Balk SJ, Gottschlich EA, Holman DM, Watson M. Counseling on sun protection and indoor tanning. Pediatrics. 2017 Dec 1;140(6). e20171680. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-1680
Balk, Sophie J. ; Gottschlich, Elizabeth A. ; Holman, Dawn M. ; Watson, Meg. / Counseling on sun protection and indoor tanning. In: Pediatrics. 2017 ; Vol. 140, No. 6.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends clinical counseling for individuals ages 10 to 24 years to decrease skin cancer risk. METHODS: A national, random sample of US American Academy of Pediatrics members practicing primary care in 2002 (response rate 55{\%}) and 2015 (response rate 43{\%}). Surveys explored attitudes and experiences regarding sun protection counseling; indoor tanning questions were added in 2015. ?2 tests compared demographics and counseling responses across years, and multivariable logistic regression models examined counseling predictors. RESULTS: More pediatricians in 2015 (34{\%}) than in 2002 (23{\%}) reported discussing sun protection during recent summer months with ≥75{\%} of patients. This pattern held across all patient age groups (each P <.001). Female and suburban pediatricians counseled more; those in the South and West counseled less. More pediatricians in 2015 than in 2002 named time as a barrier. Sun protection ranked lowest among preventive topics in both years. In 2015, approximately one-third of pediatricians reported discussing indoor tanning at least once with 10 to 13 year-old patients; approximately half discussed this with older adolescents. Most (70{\%}) did not know if their states had laws on minors' indoor tanning access; those stating they knew whether a law existed counseled more. CONCLUSIONS: Although improved, sun protection counseling rates remain low. Indoor tanning counseling can be improved. Because early-life exposure to UV radiation increases risk and clinician counseling can positively impact prevention behaviors, pediatricians have an important role in skin cancer prevention; counseling may save lives. Time constraints remain a barrier.",
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