Cost-effectiveness of evaluating the new technologies.

Theodore A. Kastner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The problem of evaluating cost-effectiveness claims is complex and not readily solved. However, such evaluation represents an important direction for technology assessment as resources become more scarce. Neumann et al.'s analysis (1996) represents one solution to the relatively simple problem of pharmacoeconomic studies. In addition, Fryback and Thornbury included a useful method for approaching the cost-effectiveness of all medical technologies. I note that the cost-effectiveness cutoff of $50,000 per quality-adjusted life year is an incremental one, meaning that new technology must be substantially more cost-effective than older technology. This is currently not the case where incremental improvements over previous technology are often quite small. Interested readers are referred to standard tests in the field, including Drummond, Stoddart, and Torrance (1987), Eisenberg (1986), and Sox, Blatt, Higgins, and Marton (1988).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)475-476
Number of pages2
JournalMental Retardation
Volume35
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cost-Benefit Analysis
new technology
Technology
costs
Pharmaceutical Economics
Biomedical Technology Assessment
technology assessment
medical technology
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Costs and Cost Analysis
evaluation
resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Cost-effectiveness of evaluating the new technologies. / Kastner, Theodore A.

In: Mental Retardation, Vol. 35, No. 6, 12.1997, p. 475-476.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kastner, TA 1997, 'Cost-effectiveness of evaluating the new technologies.', Mental Retardation, vol. 35, no. 6, pp. 475-476.
Kastner, Theodore A. / Cost-effectiveness of evaluating the new technologies. In: Mental Retardation. 1997 ; Vol. 35, No. 6. pp. 475-476.
@article{02a2a9e8948f4383843b01e57b2d3747,
title = "Cost-effectiveness of evaluating the new technologies.",
abstract = "The problem of evaluating cost-effectiveness claims is complex and not readily solved. However, such evaluation represents an important direction for technology assessment as resources become more scarce. Neumann et al.'s analysis (1996) represents one solution to the relatively simple problem of pharmacoeconomic studies. In addition, Fryback and Thornbury included a useful method for approaching the cost-effectiveness of all medical technologies. I note that the cost-effectiveness cutoff of $50,000 per quality-adjusted life year is an incremental one, meaning that new technology must be substantially more cost-effective than older technology. This is currently not the case where incremental improvements over previous technology are often quite small. Interested readers are referred to standard tests in the field, including Drummond, Stoddart, and Torrance (1987), Eisenberg (1986), and Sox, Blatt, Higgins, and Marton (1988).",
author = "Kastner, {Theodore A.}",
year = "1997",
month = "12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "35",
pages = "475--476",
journal = "Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities",
issn = "1934-9491",
publisher = "American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cost-effectiveness of evaluating the new technologies.

AU - Kastner, Theodore A.

PY - 1997/12

Y1 - 1997/12

N2 - The problem of evaluating cost-effectiveness claims is complex and not readily solved. However, such evaluation represents an important direction for technology assessment as resources become more scarce. Neumann et al.'s analysis (1996) represents one solution to the relatively simple problem of pharmacoeconomic studies. In addition, Fryback and Thornbury included a useful method for approaching the cost-effectiveness of all medical technologies. I note that the cost-effectiveness cutoff of $50,000 per quality-adjusted life year is an incremental one, meaning that new technology must be substantially more cost-effective than older technology. This is currently not the case where incremental improvements over previous technology are often quite small. Interested readers are referred to standard tests in the field, including Drummond, Stoddart, and Torrance (1987), Eisenberg (1986), and Sox, Blatt, Higgins, and Marton (1988).

AB - The problem of evaluating cost-effectiveness claims is complex and not readily solved. However, such evaluation represents an important direction for technology assessment as resources become more scarce. Neumann et al.'s analysis (1996) represents one solution to the relatively simple problem of pharmacoeconomic studies. In addition, Fryback and Thornbury included a useful method for approaching the cost-effectiveness of all medical technologies. I note that the cost-effectiveness cutoff of $50,000 per quality-adjusted life year is an incremental one, meaning that new technology must be substantially more cost-effective than older technology. This is currently not the case where incremental improvements over previous technology are often quite small. Interested readers are referred to standard tests in the field, including Drummond, Stoddart, and Torrance (1987), Eisenberg (1986), and Sox, Blatt, Higgins, and Marton (1988).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031307148&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031307148&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 9425878

AN - SCOPUS:0031307148

VL - 35

SP - 475

EP - 476

JO - Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

JF - Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

SN - 1934-9491

IS - 6

ER -