Cortisol and sodium lactate - Induced panic

Eric Hollander, M. R. Liebowitz, J. M. Gorman, B. Cohen, D. F. Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sodium lactate infusions induce panic attacks in patients with panic disorder, but not in normal controls, by an unknown mechanism. We studied the plasma cortisol responses to infusion of 0.5 mol/L of sodium lactate in 103 patients with panic disorder or agoraphobia with panic attacks, and 32 normal controls. Baseline cortisol levels did not distinguish early panickers from non-panickers and controls, but late panickers had significantly elevated baseline cortisol levels. In addition, a higher percentage of late panickers manifested an increase in cortisol during the baseline period compared with the other groups. Despite the fact that late panickers manifested elevated baseline cortisol levels, early panickers had significantly greater somatic distress as measured by the Acute Panic Inventory. There was no increase in cortisol with lactate-induced panic, and cortisol levels fell significantly during the lactate infusion in all groups. Cortisol elevation occurred with moderate anxiety but not with severe panic anxiety. These results suggest different pathophysiologic mechanisms of early and late panic, and differences between anticipatory anxiety and panic anxiety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-140
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of General Psychiatry
Volume46
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sodium Lactate
Panic
Hydrocortisone
Panic Disorder
Anxiety
Lactic Acid
Agoraphobia
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Hollander, E., Liebowitz, M. R., Gorman, J. M., Cohen, B., & Klein, D. F. (1989). Cortisol and sodium lactate - Induced panic. Archives of General Psychiatry, 46(2), 135-140.

Cortisol and sodium lactate - Induced panic. / Hollander, Eric; Liebowitz, M. R.; Gorman, J. M.; Cohen, B.; Klein, D. F.

In: Archives of General Psychiatry, Vol. 46, No. 2, 1989, p. 135-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hollander, E, Liebowitz, MR, Gorman, JM, Cohen, B & Klein, DF 1989, 'Cortisol and sodium lactate - Induced panic', Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 135-140.
Hollander E, Liebowitz MR, Gorman JM, Cohen B, Klein DF. Cortisol and sodium lactate - Induced panic. Archives of General Psychiatry. 1989;46(2):135-140.
Hollander, Eric ; Liebowitz, M. R. ; Gorman, J. M. ; Cohen, B. ; Klein, D. F. / Cortisol and sodium lactate - Induced panic. In: Archives of General Psychiatry. 1989 ; Vol. 46, No. 2. pp. 135-140.
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