Coronary care in New York City hospitals

M. Berger, H. S. Friedman, L. M. Gerber, Mark A. Greenberg, B. Levine, M. B. Mirsky, C. H. Nacht, C. Sheppard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

New York City, with six medical schools and an elaborate emergency medical system, would appear to be a locale with optimal resources for coronary care. To assess coronary care facilities and practices, a comprehensive questionnaire was prepared by a multidisciplinary committee and submitted to 72 hospitals. Seventy-nine percent (57/72) responded, including all medical school affiliated hospitals and 41 of the 45 with more than 300 beds. Twenty-nine percent (16/55) did not have a coronary care unit separate from a general intensive care unit. Thirty-three percent (18/55) of coronary care units were designed before 1970. Although 85% (46/54) of the coronary care units had a 1:2 registered nurse per patient ratio during days, only 43% (23/54) maintained this ratio at night. Central monitoring was available in all hospitals, but only 40% (21/52) indicated 24-hour continuous monitor observation. Forty-five percent (25/55) had cardiac catheterization facilities, and 43% (24/56) had an intra-aortic balloon available. Forty-six percent (26/57) of coronary care units transferred post-myocardial infarction patients to non-monitored general beds. Fifty-eight percent (31/53) offered dietary counseling to patients, and 33% (18/54) had an inpatient cardiac rehabilitation program. Thus, New York City hospitals demonstrate a marked variability in coronary care unit facilities and practices and a substantial number of hospitals deviate from published recommendations for coronary care units.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-205
Number of pages7
JournalNew York state journal of medicine
Volume89
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Coronary Care Units
Urban Hospitals
Medical Schools
Cardiac Catheterization
Intensive Care Units
Counseling
Inpatients
Emergencies
Myocardial Infarction
Nurses
Observation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Berger, M., Friedman, H. S., Gerber, L. M., Greenberg, M. A., Levine, B., Mirsky, M. B., ... Sheppard, C. (1989). Coronary care in New York City hospitals. New York state journal of medicine, 89(4), 199-205.

Coronary care in New York City hospitals. / Berger, M.; Friedman, H. S.; Gerber, L. M.; Greenberg, Mark A.; Levine, B.; Mirsky, M. B.; Nacht, C. H.; Sheppard, C.

In: New York state journal of medicine, Vol. 89, No. 4, 1989, p. 199-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Berger, M, Friedman, HS, Gerber, LM, Greenberg, MA, Levine, B, Mirsky, MB, Nacht, CH & Sheppard, C 1989, 'Coronary care in New York City hospitals', New York state journal of medicine, vol. 89, no. 4, pp. 199-205.
Berger M, Friedman HS, Gerber LM, Greenberg MA, Levine B, Mirsky MB et al. Coronary care in New York City hospitals. New York state journal of medicine. 1989;89(4):199-205.
Berger, M. ; Friedman, H. S. ; Gerber, L. M. ; Greenberg, Mark A. ; Levine, B. ; Mirsky, M. B. ; Nacht, C. H. ; Sheppard, C. / Coronary care in New York City hospitals. In: New York state journal of medicine. 1989 ; Vol. 89, No. 4. pp. 199-205.
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