Cornual heterotopic pregnancy and cornual resection after in vitro fertilization/embryo transfer: A report of two cases

J. R L De Mola, C. M. Austin, Nancy E. Judge, B. G. Assel, B. Peskin, J. M. Goldfarb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Heterotopic pregnancy occurs in about 1% of pregnancies achieved with assisted reproductive technologies. The incidence of corneal pregnancy is approximately 1% of all ectopics. CASES: Two patients became pregnant after treatment with IVF-ET. Both presented during the first trimester with evidence of an acute abdomen and ultrasonographic suspicion for cornual heterotopic pregnancies. The diagnoses were confirmed by laparoscopy, and treatment was undertaken with laparotomy with cornual resection. Both delivered viable infants by cesarean section; the first patient delivered a twin gestation at 28 weeks and the second a singleton pregnancy at 37 weeks. All infants were during well two months after delivery. CONCLUSION: Abnormal pregnancies can be detected after IVF-ET with careful follow-up, transvaginal ultrasound studies, serial hCG measurements and pelvic examinations. Cornual heterotopic pregnancies can be successfully treated with cornual resection, especially in cases presenting during the second trimester or when there is clinical evidence of an acute abdomen. All deliveries should be performed by cesarean section at term prior to labor or when tocolysis for premature labor has failed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)606-610
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist
Volume40
Issue number8
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Heterotopic Pregnancy
Embryo Transfer
Fertilization in Vitro
Pregnancy
Acute Abdomen
Cesarean Section
Tocolysis
Gynecological Examination
Assisted Reproductive Techniques
Premature Obstetric Labor
Second Pregnancy Trimester
First Pregnancy Trimester
Laparoscopy
Laparotomy
Cornual Pregnancy
Incidence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • embryo transfer
  • fertilization in vitro
  • pregnancy, ectopic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Reproductive Medicine

Cite this

Cornual heterotopic pregnancy and cornual resection after in vitro fertilization/embryo transfer : A report of two cases. / De Mola, J. R L; Austin, C. M.; Judge, Nancy E.; Assel, B. G.; Peskin, B.; Goldfarb, J. M.

In: Journal of Reproductive Medicine for the Obstetrician and Gynecologist, Vol. 40, No. 8, 1995, p. 606-610.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - BACKGROUND: Heterotopic pregnancy occurs in about 1% of pregnancies achieved with assisted reproductive technologies. The incidence of corneal pregnancy is approximately 1% of all ectopics. CASES: Two patients became pregnant after treatment with IVF-ET. Both presented during the first trimester with evidence of an acute abdomen and ultrasonographic suspicion for cornual heterotopic pregnancies. The diagnoses were confirmed by laparoscopy, and treatment was undertaken with laparotomy with cornual resection. Both delivered viable infants by cesarean section; the first patient delivered a twin gestation at 28 weeks and the second a singleton pregnancy at 37 weeks. All infants were during well two months after delivery. CONCLUSION: Abnormal pregnancies can be detected after IVF-ET with careful follow-up, transvaginal ultrasound studies, serial hCG measurements and pelvic examinations. Cornual heterotopic pregnancies can be successfully treated with cornual resection, especially in cases presenting during the second trimester or when there is clinical evidence of an acute abdomen. All deliveries should be performed by cesarean section at term prior to labor or when tocolysis for premature labor has failed.

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