Computational fluid dynamics modeling of upper airway during tidal breathing using volume-gated mri in osas and control subjects

Steven C. Persak, Sanghun Sin, Raanan Arens, David M. Wootton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis was used to model the effect of collapsing airway geometry on internal pressure and velocity in the pharyngeal airway of sedated obese children with and without obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Geometry was reconstructed from volume-gated magnetic resonance images during normal tidal breathing of the respiratory cycle and solved using flow data averaged over 12 consecutive breathing cycles. In the OSAS subject, collapse initiated in the proximal nasopharynx and continued downstream into the oropharynx, while the control experienced negligible collapse. Tube laws (pressure vs. cross-section area) derived for the nasopharynx and oropharynx, indicated the oropharynx in the OSAS subject more compliant than the nasopharynx (1.028 mm2/Pa vs. 0.449 mm2/Pa) and had a lower theoretical limiting flow rate, confirming the oropharynx as the flow-limiting segment of the airway in this subject. This new method may help to differentiate anatomical and functional factors in airway collapse.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASME 2011 Summer Bioengineering Conference, SBC 2011
Pages945-946
Number of pages2
EditionPARTS A AND B
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes
EventASME 2011 Summer Bioengineering Conference, SBC 2011 - Farmington, PA, United States
Duration: Jun 22 2011Jun 25 2011

Other

OtherASME 2011 Summer Bioengineering Conference, SBC 2011
CountryUnited States
CityFarmington, PA
Period6/22/116/25/11

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Computational fluid dynamics
Geometry
Magnetic resonance
Dynamic analysis
Flow rate
Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Persak, S. C., Sin, S., Arens, R., & Wootton, D. M. (2011). Computational fluid dynamics modeling of upper airway during tidal breathing using volume-gated mri in osas and control subjects. In ASME 2011 Summer Bioengineering Conference, SBC 2011 (PARTS A AND B ed., pp. 945-946) https://doi.org/10.1115/SBC2011-53311

Computational fluid dynamics modeling of upper airway during tidal breathing using volume-gated mri in osas and control subjects. / Persak, Steven C.; Sin, Sanghun; Arens, Raanan; Wootton, David M.

ASME 2011 Summer Bioengineering Conference, SBC 2011. PARTS A AND B. ed. 2011. p. 945-946.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Persak, SC, Sin, S, Arens, R & Wootton, DM 2011, Computational fluid dynamics modeling of upper airway during tidal breathing using volume-gated mri in osas and control subjects. in ASME 2011 Summer Bioengineering Conference, SBC 2011. PARTS A AND B edn, pp. 945-946, ASME 2011 Summer Bioengineering Conference, SBC 2011, Farmington, PA, United States, 6/22/11. https://doi.org/10.1115/SBC2011-53311
Persak, Steven C. ; Sin, Sanghun ; Arens, Raanan ; Wootton, David M. / Computational fluid dynamics modeling of upper airway during tidal breathing using volume-gated mri in osas and control subjects. ASME 2011 Summer Bioengineering Conference, SBC 2011. PARTS A AND B. ed. 2011. pp. 945-946
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