Compton scattering by internal shields based on melanin-containing mushrooms provides protection of gastrointestinal tract from ionizing radiation

Ekaterina Revskaya, Peter Chu, Robertha C. Howell, Andrew D. Schweitzer, Ruth A. Bryan, Matthew Harris, Gary J. Gerfen, Zewei Jiang, Thomas Jandl, Kami Kim, Li Min Ting, Rani S. Sellers, Ekaterina Dadachova, Arturo Casadevall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a need for radioprotectors that protect normal tissues from ionizing radiation in patients receiving high doses of radiation and during nuclear emergencies. We investigated the possibility of creating an efficient oral radioprotector based on the natural pigment melanin that would act as an internal shield and protect the tissues via Compton scattering followed by free radical scavenging. CD-1 mice were fed melanin-containing black edible mushrooms Auricularia auricila-judae before 9 Gy total body irradiation. The location of the mushrooms in the body before irradiation was determined by in vivo fluorescent imaging. Black mushrooms protected 80% of mice from the lethal dose, while control mice or those given melanin-devoid mushrooms died from gastrointestinal syndrome. The crypts of mice given black mushrooms showed less apoptosis and more cell division than those in control mice, and their white blood cell and platelet counts were restored at 45 days to preradiation levels. The role of melanin in radioprotection was proven by the fact that mice given white mushrooms supplemented with melanin survived at the same rate as mice given black mushrooms. The ability of melanin-containing mushrooms to provide remarkable protection against radiation suggests that they could be developed into oral radioprotectors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)570-576
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals
Volume27
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2012

Fingerprint

Agaricales
Melanins
Ionizing Radiation
Gastrointestinal Tract
Mushroom Bodies
Radiation Protection
Whole-Body Irradiation
Platelet Count
Leukocyte Count
Cell Division
Free Radicals
Emergencies
Radiation
Apoptosis

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Black mushrooms
  • GI syndrome
  • Melanin
  • Radioprotection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Compton scattering by internal shields based on melanin-containing mushrooms provides protection of gastrointestinal tract from ionizing radiation. / Revskaya, Ekaterina; Chu, Peter; Howell, Robertha C.; Schweitzer, Andrew D.; Bryan, Ruth A.; Harris, Matthew; Gerfen, Gary J.; Jiang, Zewei; Jandl, Thomas; Kim, Kami; Ting, Li Min; Sellers, Rani S.; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo.

In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, Vol. 27, No. 9, 01.11.2012, p. 570-576.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Revskaya, E, Chu, P, Howell, RC, Schweitzer, AD, Bryan, RA, Harris, M, Gerfen, GJ, Jiang, Z, Jandl, T, Kim, K, Ting, LM, Sellers, RS, Dadachova, E & Casadevall, A 2012, 'Compton scattering by internal shields based on melanin-containing mushrooms provides protection of gastrointestinal tract from ionizing radiation', Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals, vol. 27, no. 9, pp. 570-576. https://doi.org/10.1089/cbr.2012.1318
Revskaya, Ekaterina ; Chu, Peter ; Howell, Robertha C. ; Schweitzer, Andrew D. ; Bryan, Ruth A. ; Harris, Matthew ; Gerfen, Gary J. ; Jiang, Zewei ; Jandl, Thomas ; Kim, Kami ; Ting, Li Min ; Sellers, Rani S. ; Dadachova, Ekaterina ; Casadevall, Arturo. / Compton scattering by internal shields based on melanin-containing mushrooms provides protection of gastrointestinal tract from ionizing radiation. In: Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals. 2012 ; Vol. 27, No. 9. pp. 570-576.
@article{4e147eee51914fc9accfdcb5b05f1966,
title = "Compton scattering by internal shields based on melanin-containing mushrooms provides protection of gastrointestinal tract from ionizing radiation",
abstract = "There is a need for radioprotectors that protect normal tissues from ionizing radiation in patients receiving high doses of radiation and during nuclear emergencies. We investigated the possibility of creating an efficient oral radioprotector based on the natural pigment melanin that would act as an internal shield and protect the tissues via Compton scattering followed by free radical scavenging. CD-1 mice were fed melanin-containing black edible mushrooms Auricularia auricila-judae before 9 Gy total body irradiation. The location of the mushrooms in the body before irradiation was determined by in vivo fluorescent imaging. Black mushrooms protected 80{\%} of mice from the lethal dose, while control mice or those given melanin-devoid mushrooms died from gastrointestinal syndrome. The crypts of mice given black mushrooms showed less apoptosis and more cell division than those in control mice, and their white blood cell and platelet counts were restored at 45 days to preradiation levels. The role of melanin in radioprotection was proven by the fact that mice given white mushrooms supplemented with melanin survived at the same rate as mice given black mushrooms. The ability of melanin-containing mushrooms to provide remarkable protection against radiation suggests that they could be developed into oral radioprotectors.",
keywords = "Apoptosis, Black mushrooms, GI syndrome, Melanin, Radioprotection",
author = "Ekaterina Revskaya and Peter Chu and Howell, {Robertha C.} and Schweitzer, {Andrew D.} and Bryan, {Ruth A.} and Matthew Harris and Gerfen, {Gary J.} and Zewei Jiang and Thomas Jandl and Kami Kim and Ting, {Li Min} and Sellers, {Rani S.} and Ekaterina Dadachova and Arturo Casadevall",
year = "2012",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/cbr.2012.1318",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "570--576",
journal = "Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals",
issn = "1084-9785",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Compton scattering by internal shields based on melanin-containing mushrooms provides protection of gastrointestinal tract from ionizing radiation

AU - Revskaya, Ekaterina

AU - Chu, Peter

AU - Howell, Robertha C.

AU - Schweitzer, Andrew D.

AU - Bryan, Ruth A.

AU - Harris, Matthew

AU - Gerfen, Gary J.

AU - Jiang, Zewei

AU - Jandl, Thomas

AU - Kim, Kami

AU - Ting, Li Min

AU - Sellers, Rani S.

AU - Dadachova, Ekaterina

AU - Casadevall, Arturo

PY - 2012/11/1

Y1 - 2012/11/1

N2 - There is a need for radioprotectors that protect normal tissues from ionizing radiation in patients receiving high doses of radiation and during nuclear emergencies. We investigated the possibility of creating an efficient oral radioprotector based on the natural pigment melanin that would act as an internal shield and protect the tissues via Compton scattering followed by free radical scavenging. CD-1 mice were fed melanin-containing black edible mushrooms Auricularia auricila-judae before 9 Gy total body irradiation. The location of the mushrooms in the body before irradiation was determined by in vivo fluorescent imaging. Black mushrooms protected 80% of mice from the lethal dose, while control mice or those given melanin-devoid mushrooms died from gastrointestinal syndrome. The crypts of mice given black mushrooms showed less apoptosis and more cell division than those in control mice, and their white blood cell and platelet counts were restored at 45 days to preradiation levels. The role of melanin in radioprotection was proven by the fact that mice given white mushrooms supplemented with melanin survived at the same rate as mice given black mushrooms. The ability of melanin-containing mushrooms to provide remarkable protection against radiation suggests that they could be developed into oral radioprotectors.

AB - There is a need for radioprotectors that protect normal tissues from ionizing radiation in patients receiving high doses of radiation and during nuclear emergencies. We investigated the possibility of creating an efficient oral radioprotector based on the natural pigment melanin that would act as an internal shield and protect the tissues via Compton scattering followed by free radical scavenging. CD-1 mice were fed melanin-containing black edible mushrooms Auricularia auricila-judae before 9 Gy total body irradiation. The location of the mushrooms in the body before irradiation was determined by in vivo fluorescent imaging. Black mushrooms protected 80% of mice from the lethal dose, while control mice or those given melanin-devoid mushrooms died from gastrointestinal syndrome. The crypts of mice given black mushrooms showed less apoptosis and more cell division than those in control mice, and their white blood cell and platelet counts were restored at 45 days to preradiation levels. The role of melanin in radioprotection was proven by the fact that mice given white mushrooms supplemented with melanin survived at the same rate as mice given black mushrooms. The ability of melanin-containing mushrooms to provide remarkable protection against radiation suggests that they could be developed into oral radioprotectors.

KW - Apoptosis

KW - Black mushrooms

KW - GI syndrome

KW - Melanin

KW - Radioprotection

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84868268330&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84868268330&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/cbr.2012.1318

DO - 10.1089/cbr.2012.1318

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 570

EP - 576

JO - Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals

JF - Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals

SN - 1084-9785

IS - 9

ER -