Comparison of the vaginal microbial communities in women with recurrent genital HSV receiving acyclovir intravaginal rings

Luke K. Ursell, Manjula Gunawardana, Simon Chang, Madeline Mullen, John A. Moss, Betsy Herold, Marla J. Keller, Daniel McDonald, Antonio González, Rob Knight, Marc M. Baum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vaginally administered antiviral agents may reduce the risk of HIV and HSV acquisition. Delivery of these drugs using intravaginal rings (IVRs) holds the potential benefits of improving adherence and decreasing systemic exposure, while maintaining steady-state drug levels in the vaginal tract. Elucidating how IVRs interact with the vaginal microbiome constitutes a critical step in evaluating the safety of these devices, as shifts the vaginal microbiome have been linked with several disease states. To date, clinical IVR trials have relied on culture-dependent methods that omit the high diversity of unculturable microbial population. Longitudinal, culture-independent characterization of the microbiota in vaginal samples from 6 women with recurrent genital HSV who used an acyclovir IVR was carried out and compared to the communities developing in biofilms on the IVR surface. The analysis utilized Illumina MiSeq sequence datasets generated from bar-coded amplicons of 16S rRNA gene fragments. Specific taxa in the vaginal communities of the study participants were found to be associated with the duration of recurrent genital HSV status and the number of HSV outbreaks. Taxonomic comparison of the vaginal and IVR biofilm communities did not reveal any significant differences, suggesting that the IVRs were not systematically enriched with members of the vaginal microbiome. Device usage did not alter the participants' vaginal microbial communities, within the confines of the current study design. Rigorous, molecular analysis of the effects of intravaginal devices on the corresponding microbial communities shows promise for integration with traditional approaches in the clinical evaluation of candidate products.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-94
Number of pages8
JournalAntiviral Research
Volume102
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Acyclovir
Microbiota
Biofilms
Female Contraceptive Devices
Protective Devices
Equipment and Supplies
rRNA Genes
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Antiviral Agents
Disease Outbreaks
HIV
Population

Keywords

  • 16S rRNA gene sequencing
  • Anti-HSV-2
  • Biofilm
  • Intravaginal ring
  • Microbicide safety
  • Vaginal microbiota

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Comparison of the vaginal microbial communities in women with recurrent genital HSV receiving acyclovir intravaginal rings. / Ursell, Luke K.; Gunawardana, Manjula; Chang, Simon; Mullen, Madeline; Moss, John A.; Herold, Betsy; Keller, Marla J.; McDonald, Daniel; González, Antonio; Knight, Rob; Baum, Marc M.

In: Antiviral Research, Vol. 102, 02.2014, p. 87-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ursell, LK, Gunawardana, M, Chang, S, Mullen, M, Moss, JA, Herold, B, Keller, MJ, McDonald, D, González, A, Knight, R & Baum, MM 2014, 'Comparison of the vaginal microbial communities in women with recurrent genital HSV receiving acyclovir intravaginal rings', Antiviral Research, vol. 102, pp. 87-94. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.antiviral.2013.12.004
Ursell, Luke K. ; Gunawardana, Manjula ; Chang, Simon ; Mullen, Madeline ; Moss, John A. ; Herold, Betsy ; Keller, Marla J. ; McDonald, Daniel ; González, Antonio ; Knight, Rob ; Baum, Marc M. / Comparison of the vaginal microbial communities in women with recurrent genital HSV receiving acyclovir intravaginal rings. In: Antiviral Research. 2014 ; Vol. 102. pp. 87-94.
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