Comparison of antibodies that mediate HIV type 1 gp120 antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in asymptomatic HIV type 1-positive men and women

Mariana M. Mata, Joyce R. Iwema, Shanna Dell, Leslie Neems, Beth D. Jamieson, John Phair, Mardge H. Cohen, Kathryn Anastos, Linda L. Baum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that HIV-specific antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) antibodies contribute to protective immunity against HIV. An important characteristic of future HIV vaccines will, therefore, be the ability to stimulate production of these antibodies in both men and women. Early studies suggest that men may have a better ADCC antibody response against HIV than women. Our objective was to determine whether men and women differ with respect to their ADCC response to HIV-1 gp120. HIV-positive, asymptomatic untreated men and women were matched for race, age, CD4<sup>+</sup> T cell number, HIV-1 viral load, and treatment and HIV-1 gp120 ADCC antibody titers were compared. A standard <sup>51</sup>Cr-release assay was used to determine HIV-1 gp120 ADCC antibody titers in HIV-1-seropositive individuals from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS; n=32) and the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS; n=32). Both sexes had high ADCC titers against HIV-1 gp120: 34.4% (n=11) and 40.6% (n=13) of men and women, respectively, had titers of 10,000; 62.5% (n=20) and 56.3% (n=18) had titers of 100,000. Groups did not differ in percent specific release (% SR), lytic units (LU), correlations of titer to viral load, or titer to CD4<sup>+</sup> T cells in men or women. Both groups also had similar cross-clade ADCC antibody responses (p>0.5 for % SR and LU). Comparable groups of asymptomatic HIV-1-infected men and women had comparable HIV-1 gp120 ADCC antibodies. Both sexes had significant cross-clade reactivity. Differences between men and women may become evident as disease progresses; this should be evaluated at later stages of HIV-1 infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-57
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity
HIV-1
Antibodies
HIV
Antibody Formation
Viral Load
T-Lymphocytes
AIDS Vaccines
HIV Antibodies
HIV Infections
Immunity
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Cohort Studies
Cell Count

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Medicine(all)

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Comparison of antibodies that mediate HIV type 1 gp120 antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in asymptomatic HIV type 1-positive men and women. / Mata, Mariana M.; Iwema, Joyce R.; Dell, Shanna; Neems, Leslie; Jamieson, Beth D.; Phair, John; Cohen, Mardge H.; Anastos, Kathryn; Baum, Linda L.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 50-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mata, Mariana M. ; Iwema, Joyce R. ; Dell, Shanna ; Neems, Leslie ; Jamieson, Beth D. ; Phair, John ; Cohen, Mardge H. ; Anastos, Kathryn ; Baum, Linda L. / Comparison of antibodies that mediate HIV type 1 gp120 antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in asymptomatic HIV type 1-positive men and women. In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 2014 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 50-57.
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