Comparative study of the effects of a 1-year dietary intervention of a low-carbohydrate diet versus a low-fat diet on weight and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes

Nichola J. Davis, Nora Tomuta, Clyde B. Schechter, Carmen R. Isasi, C. J. Segal-Isaacson, Daniel T. Stein, Joel Zonszein, Judith Wylie-Rosett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To compare the effects of a 1-year intervention with a low-carbohydrate and a low-fat diet on weight loss and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This study is a randomized clinical trial of 105 overweight adults with type 2 diabetes. Primary outcomes were weight and A1C. Secondary outcomes included blood pressure and lipids. Outcome measures were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS - The greatest reduction in weight and A1C occurred within the first 3 months. Weight loss occurred faster in the low-carbohydrate group than in the low-fat group (P = 0.005), but at 1 year a similar 3.4% weight reduction was seen in both dietary groups. There was no significant change in A1C in either group at 1 year. There was no change in blood pressure, but a greater increase in HDL was observed in the low-carbohydrate group (P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS - Among patients with type 2 diabetes, after 1 year a low-carbohydrate diet had effects on weight and A1C similar to those seen with a low-fat diet. There was no significant effect on blood pressure, but the low-carbohydrate diet produced a greater increase in HDL cholesterol.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1147-1152
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

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Carbohydrate-Restricted Diet
Fat-Restricted Diet
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Weight Loss
Weights and Measures
Carbohydrates
Blood Pressure
HDL Cholesterol
Research Design
Randomized Controlled Trials
Fats
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

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title = "Comparative study of the effects of a 1-year dietary intervention of a low-carbohydrate diet versus a low-fat diet on weight and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE - To compare the effects of a 1-year intervention with a low-carbohydrate and a low-fat diet on weight loss and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This study is a randomized clinical trial of 105 overweight adults with type 2 diabetes. Primary outcomes were weight and A1C. Secondary outcomes included blood pressure and lipids. Outcome measures were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS - The greatest reduction in weight and A1C occurred within the first 3 months. Weight loss occurred faster in the low-carbohydrate group than in the low-fat group (P = 0.005), but at 1 year a similar 3.4{\%} weight reduction was seen in both dietary groups. There was no significant change in A1C in either group at 1 year. There was no change in blood pressure, but a greater increase in HDL was observed in the low-carbohydrate group (P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS - Among patients with type 2 diabetes, after 1 year a low-carbohydrate diet had effects on weight and A1C similar to those seen with a low-fat diet. There was no significant effect on blood pressure, but the low-carbohydrate diet produced a greater increase in HDL cholesterol.",
author = "Davis, {Nichola J.} and Nora Tomuta and Schechter, {Clyde B.} and Isasi, {Carmen R.} and Segal-Isaacson, {C. J.} and Stein, {Daniel T.} and Joel Zonszein and Judith Wylie-Rosett",
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AU - Tomuta, Nora

AU - Schechter, Clyde B.

AU - Isasi, Carmen R.

AU - Segal-Isaacson, C. J.

AU - Stein, Daniel T.

AU - Zonszein, Joel

AU - Wylie-Rosett, Judith

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N2 - OBJECTIVE - To compare the effects of a 1-year intervention with a low-carbohydrate and a low-fat diet on weight loss and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This study is a randomized clinical trial of 105 overweight adults with type 2 diabetes. Primary outcomes were weight and A1C. Secondary outcomes included blood pressure and lipids. Outcome measures were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months. RESULTS - The greatest reduction in weight and A1C occurred within the first 3 months. Weight loss occurred faster in the low-carbohydrate group than in the low-fat group (P = 0.005), but at 1 year a similar 3.4% weight reduction was seen in both dietary groups. There was no significant change in A1C in either group at 1 year. There was no change in blood pressure, but a greater increase in HDL was observed in the low-carbohydrate group (P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS - Among patients with type 2 diabetes, after 1 year a low-carbohydrate diet had effects on weight and A1C similar to those seen with a low-fat diet. There was no significant effect on blood pressure, but the low-carbohydrate diet produced a greater increase in HDL cholesterol.

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