Comparative sensitivity of quantitative EEG (QEEG) spectrograms for detecting seizure subtypes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To assess the sensitivity of Persyst version 12 QEEG spectrograms to detect focal, focal with secondarily generalized, and generalized onset seizures. Methods: A cohort of 562 seizures from 58 patients was analyzed. Successive recordings with 2 or more seizures during continuous EEG monitoring for clinical indications in the ICU or EMU between July 2016 and January 2017 were included. Patient ages ranged from 5 to 64 years (mean = 36 years). There were 125 focal seizures, 187 secondarily generalized and 250 generalized seizures from 58 patients analyzed. Seizures were identified and classified independently by two epileptologists. A correlate to the seizure pattern in the raw EEG was sought in the QEEG spectrograms in 4–6 h EEG epochs surrounding the identified seizures. A given spectrogram was interpreted as indicating a seizure, if at the time of a seizure it showed a visually significant departure from the pre-event baseline. Sensitivities for seizure detection using each spectrogram were determined for each seizure subtype. Results: Overall sensitivities of the QEEG spectrograms for detecting seizures ranged from 43% to 72%, with highest sensitivity (402/562,72%) by the seizure detection trend. The asymmetry spectrogram had the highest sensitivity for detecting focal seizures (117/125,94%). The FFT spectrogram was most sensitive for detecting secondarily generalized seizures (158/187, 84%). The seizure detection trend was the most sensitive for generalized onset seizures (197/250,79%). Conclusions: Our study suggests that different seizure types have specific patterns in the Persyst QEEG spectrograms. Identifying these patterns in the EEG can significantly increase the sensitivity for seizure identification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-75
Number of pages6
JournalSeizure
Volume55
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Electroencephalography
Seizures

Keywords

  • Amplitude EEG spectrogram
  • Asymmetry relative spectrogram
  • FFT spectrogram
  • Quantitative EEG
  • Rhythmicity spectrogram
  • Seizure detection trend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Comparative sensitivity of quantitative EEG (QEEG) spectrograms for detecting seizure subtypes. / Goenka, Ajay; Boro, Alexis D.; Yozawitz, Elissa G.

In: Seizure, Vol. 55, 01.02.2018, p. 70-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{65c57e3732b6433db9d95281cf976565,
title = "Comparative sensitivity of quantitative EEG (QEEG) spectrograms for detecting seizure subtypes",
abstract = "Purpose: To assess the sensitivity of Persyst version 12 QEEG spectrograms to detect focal, focal with secondarily generalized, and generalized onset seizures. Methods: A cohort of 562 seizures from 58 patients was analyzed. Successive recordings with 2 or more seizures during continuous EEG monitoring for clinical indications in the ICU or EMU between July 2016 and January 2017 were included. Patient ages ranged from 5 to 64 years (mean = 36 years). There were 125 focal seizures, 187 secondarily generalized and 250 generalized seizures from 58 patients analyzed. Seizures were identified and classified independently by two epileptologists. A correlate to the seizure pattern in the raw EEG was sought in the QEEG spectrograms in 4–6 h EEG epochs surrounding the identified seizures. A given spectrogram was interpreted as indicating a seizure, if at the time of a seizure it showed a visually significant departure from the pre-event baseline. Sensitivities for seizure detection using each spectrogram were determined for each seizure subtype. Results: Overall sensitivities of the QEEG spectrograms for detecting seizures ranged from 43{\%} to 72{\%}, with highest sensitivity (402/562,72{\%}) by the seizure detection trend. The asymmetry spectrogram had the highest sensitivity for detecting focal seizures (117/125,94{\%}). The FFT spectrogram was most sensitive for detecting secondarily generalized seizures (158/187, 84{\%}). The seizure detection trend was the most sensitive for generalized onset seizures (197/250,79{\%}). Conclusions: Our study suggests that different seizure types have specific patterns in the Persyst QEEG spectrograms. Identifying these patterns in the EEG can significantly increase the sensitivity for seizure identification.",
keywords = "Amplitude EEG spectrogram, Asymmetry relative spectrogram, FFT spectrogram, Quantitative EEG, Rhythmicity spectrogram, Seizure detection trend",
author = "Ajay Goenka and Boro, {Alexis D.} and Yozawitz, {Elissa G.}",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.seizure.2018.01.008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "55",
pages = "70--75",
journal = "Seizure : the journal of the British Epilepsy Association",
issn = "1059-1311",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparative sensitivity of quantitative EEG (QEEG) spectrograms for detecting seizure subtypes

AU - Goenka, Ajay

AU - Boro, Alexis D.

AU - Yozawitz, Elissa G.

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - Purpose: To assess the sensitivity of Persyst version 12 QEEG spectrograms to detect focal, focal with secondarily generalized, and generalized onset seizures. Methods: A cohort of 562 seizures from 58 patients was analyzed. Successive recordings with 2 or more seizures during continuous EEG monitoring for clinical indications in the ICU or EMU between July 2016 and January 2017 were included. Patient ages ranged from 5 to 64 years (mean = 36 years). There were 125 focal seizures, 187 secondarily generalized and 250 generalized seizures from 58 patients analyzed. Seizures were identified and classified independently by two epileptologists. A correlate to the seizure pattern in the raw EEG was sought in the QEEG spectrograms in 4–6 h EEG epochs surrounding the identified seizures. A given spectrogram was interpreted as indicating a seizure, if at the time of a seizure it showed a visually significant departure from the pre-event baseline. Sensitivities for seizure detection using each spectrogram were determined for each seizure subtype. Results: Overall sensitivities of the QEEG spectrograms for detecting seizures ranged from 43% to 72%, with highest sensitivity (402/562,72%) by the seizure detection trend. The asymmetry spectrogram had the highest sensitivity for detecting focal seizures (117/125,94%). The FFT spectrogram was most sensitive for detecting secondarily generalized seizures (158/187, 84%). The seizure detection trend was the most sensitive for generalized onset seizures (197/250,79%). Conclusions: Our study suggests that different seizure types have specific patterns in the Persyst QEEG spectrograms. Identifying these patterns in the EEG can significantly increase the sensitivity for seizure identification.

AB - Purpose: To assess the sensitivity of Persyst version 12 QEEG spectrograms to detect focal, focal with secondarily generalized, and generalized onset seizures. Methods: A cohort of 562 seizures from 58 patients was analyzed. Successive recordings with 2 or more seizures during continuous EEG monitoring for clinical indications in the ICU or EMU between July 2016 and January 2017 were included. Patient ages ranged from 5 to 64 years (mean = 36 years). There were 125 focal seizures, 187 secondarily generalized and 250 generalized seizures from 58 patients analyzed. Seizures were identified and classified independently by two epileptologists. A correlate to the seizure pattern in the raw EEG was sought in the QEEG spectrograms in 4–6 h EEG epochs surrounding the identified seizures. A given spectrogram was interpreted as indicating a seizure, if at the time of a seizure it showed a visually significant departure from the pre-event baseline. Sensitivities for seizure detection using each spectrogram were determined for each seizure subtype. Results: Overall sensitivities of the QEEG spectrograms for detecting seizures ranged from 43% to 72%, with highest sensitivity (402/562,72%) by the seizure detection trend. The asymmetry spectrogram had the highest sensitivity for detecting focal seizures (117/125,94%). The FFT spectrogram was most sensitive for detecting secondarily generalized seizures (158/187, 84%). The seizure detection trend was the most sensitive for generalized onset seizures (197/250,79%). Conclusions: Our study suggests that different seizure types have specific patterns in the Persyst QEEG spectrograms. Identifying these patterns in the EEG can significantly increase the sensitivity for seizure identification.

KW - Amplitude EEG spectrogram

KW - Asymmetry relative spectrogram

KW - FFT spectrogram

KW - Quantitative EEG

KW - Rhythmicity spectrogram

KW - Seizure detection trend

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85041413644&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85041413644&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.seizure.2018.01.008

DO - 10.1016/j.seizure.2018.01.008

M3 - Article

VL - 55

SP - 70

EP - 75

JO - Seizure : the journal of the British Epilepsy Association

JF - Seizure : the journal of the British Epilepsy Association

SN - 1059-1311

ER -