Comorbidity of migraine

Ann I. Scher, Marcelo E. Bigal, Richard B. Lipton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

124 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review: Comorbidity refers to the greater than coincidental association of separate conditions in the same individuals. Historically, a number of conditions have been noted to be comorbid with migraine, notably psychiatric disorders (anxiety, depression, panic disorder), epilepsy, asthma, and some congenital heart defects. Migraine sufferers have increased medical costs overall compared with others of the same sex and age, even after considering the cost of specific migraine treatment. Thus, estimates of the burden of migraine often include the costs of conditions comorbid with it. Recent findings: Conditions may be comorbid through a variety of mechanisms. Comorbidity may be an artifact of diagnostic uncertainty when symptom profiles overlap or when diagnosis is not based on objective markers. Comorbidity may arise due to unidirectional causality, such as migraine resulting in blood pressure changes due to headache-specific treatment. Finally, conditions may be comorbid because of shared genetic or other factors that increase the risk of both conditions. In such cases, understanding these shared risk factors may lead to greater understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of migraine. Summary: In this article, we wilt review recent developments related to migraine comorbidity. We will emphasize findings related to the comorbidity of migraine with clinical and sub-clinical vascular brain lesions, congenital heart defects, coronary heart disease, psychiatric illness, and other pain conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-310
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Neurology
Volume18
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 2005

Fingerprint

Migraine Disorders
Comorbidity
Congenital Heart Defects
Costs and Cost Analysis
Psychiatry
Panic Disorder
Anxiety Disorders
Causality
Artifacts
Uncertainty
Coronary Disease
Blood Vessels
Headache
Epilepsy
Asthma
Depression
Blood Pressure
Pain
Brain
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Congenital heart defects
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Migraine
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Scher, A. I., Bigal, M. E., & Lipton, R. B. (2005). Comorbidity of migraine. Current Opinion in Neurology, 18(3), 305-310.

Comorbidity of migraine. / Scher, Ann I.; Bigal, Marcelo E.; Lipton, Richard B.

In: Current Opinion in Neurology, Vol. 18, No. 3, 06.2005, p. 305-310.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scher, AI, Bigal, ME & Lipton, RB 2005, 'Comorbidity of migraine', Current Opinion in Neurology, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 305-310.
Scher AI, Bigal ME, Lipton RB. Comorbidity of migraine. Current Opinion in Neurology. 2005 Jun;18(3):305-310.
Scher, Ann I. ; Bigal, Marcelo E. ; Lipton, Richard B. / Comorbidity of migraine. In: Current Opinion in Neurology. 2005 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 305-310.
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