Colonic Injuries Induced by Inhalational Exposure to Particulate-Matter Air Pollution

Xiaobo Li, Jian Cui, Hongbao Yang, Hao Sun, Runze Lu, Na Gao, Qingtao Meng, Shenshen Wu, Jiong Wu, Michael Aschner, Rui Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Particulate matter (PM) exposure has been associated with intestinal disorders. Therefore, there is an urgent need to understand the precise molecular mechanism involved and explore potential prevention strategies. In this study, inhaled PM is shown to activate inflammatory pathways in murine colon. In a panel study, it is found that ambient PM levels are significantly associated with elevated number of fecal white blood cells in healthy subjects. Acting as a promoter, PM exposure accelerates chemical carcinogenesis-induced colonic tumor formation in a murine model. Mechanistically, RNA-seq assays suggest activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT cascades in chronically PM-exposed human colon mucosal epithelial cells. Ablation of up-stream driver fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) effectively inhibits inflammation and neoplasia in PM-exposed murine colons. Notably, dietary curcumin supplement is shown to protect against PM-induced colonic injuries in mice. Collectively, these findings identify that PM exposure accelerates colonic tumorigenesis in a PI3K/AKT-dependent manner and suggests potential nutrient supplement for prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1900180
JournalAdvanced Science
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Dietary supplements
air pollution
Particulate Matter
Air Pollution
Fibroblasts
Ablation
Air pollution
RNA
particulates
Nutrients
Tumors
Assays
Blood
Chemical activation
Cells
Wounds and Injuries
Colon
1-Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase
supplements
Phosphatidylinositols

Keywords

  • colon
  • curcumin
  • inflammation
  • particulate matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Colonic Injuries Induced by Inhalational Exposure to Particulate-Matter Air Pollution. / Li, Xiaobo; Cui, Jian; Yang, Hongbao; Sun, Hao; Lu, Runze; Gao, Na; Meng, Qingtao; Wu, Shenshen; Wu, Jiong; Aschner, Michael; Chen, Rui.

In: Advanced Science, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, Xiaobo ; Cui, Jian ; Yang, Hongbao ; Sun, Hao ; Lu, Runze ; Gao, Na ; Meng, Qingtao ; Wu, Shenshen ; Wu, Jiong ; Aschner, Michael ; Chen, Rui. / Colonic Injuries Induced by Inhalational Exposure to Particulate-Matter Air Pollution. In: Advanced Science. 2019.
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AU - Lu, Runze

AU - Gao, Na

AU - Meng, Qingtao

AU - Wu, Shenshen

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AU - Aschner, Michael

AU - Chen, Rui

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