Clostridium difficile infection in returning travellers

For the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background There is increasing recognition of the contribution of community-acquired cases to the global burden of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The epidemiology of CDI among international travellers is poorly understood, and factors associated with international travel, such as antibiotic use and changes in gut microbiota, could potentially put travellers at higher risk. Methods We summarized demographic, travel-associated and geographic characteristics of travellers with CDI in the GeoSentinel database from 1997 to 2015. We also surveyed GeoSentinel sites to compare various testing indications, approaches, and diagnostic modalities. Results We identified 260 GeoSentinel records, including 187 that satisfied criteria for analysis (confirmed cases in non-immigrant travellers aged > 2 years, seen < 12 weeks post-travel). CDI was reported in all age groups and in travellers to all world regions; the largest proportions of cases having destinations in Asia (31%), Central/South America or the Caribbean (30%) and Africa (24%). Our site survey revealed substantial heterogeneity of testing approaches between sites; the most commonly used test was the C. difficile toxin gene PCR. Conclusions CDI is encountered in returning international travellers, although there is considerable variability in testing practices. These data underscore the importance of awareness of C. difficile as a potential cause of travelassociated diarrhoea.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbertaw099
JournalJournal of Travel Medicine
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

Clostridium Infections
Clostridium difficile
Central America
South America
Diarrhea
Epidemiology
Age Groups
Demography
Databases
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords

  • Clostridium difficile
  • Diarrhoea
  • Travellers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Clostridium difficile infection in returning travellers. / For the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network.

In: Journal of Travel Medicine, Vol. 24, No. 3, taw099, 01.05.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

For the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network 2017, 'Clostridium difficile infection in returning travellers', Journal of Travel Medicine, vol. 24, no. 3, taw099. https://doi.org/10.1093/jtm/taw099
For the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network. / Clostridium difficile infection in returning travellers. In: Journal of Travel Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 24, No. 3.
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title = "Clostridium difficile infection in returning travellers",
abstract = "Background There is increasing recognition of the contribution of community-acquired cases to the global burden of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The epidemiology of CDI among international travellers is poorly understood, and factors associated with international travel, such as antibiotic use and changes in gut microbiota, could potentially put travellers at higher risk. Methods We summarized demographic, travel-associated and geographic characteristics of travellers with CDI in the GeoSentinel database from 1997 to 2015. We also surveyed GeoSentinel sites to compare various testing indications, approaches, and diagnostic modalities. Results We identified 260 GeoSentinel records, including 187 that satisfied criteria for analysis (confirmed cases in non-immigrant travellers aged > 2 years, seen < 12 weeks post-travel). CDI was reported in all age groups and in travellers to all world regions; the largest proportions of cases having destinations in Asia (31{\%}), Central/South America or the Caribbean (30{\%}) and Africa (24{\%}). Our site survey revealed substantial heterogeneity of testing approaches between sites; the most commonly used test was the C. difficile toxin gene PCR. Conclusions CDI is encountered in returning international travellers, although there is considerable variability in testing practices. These data underscore the importance of awareness of C. difficile as a potential cause of travelassociated diarrhoea.",
keywords = "Clostridium difficile, Diarrhoea, Travellers",
author = "{For the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network} and {Michal Stevens}, A. and Esposito, {Douglas H.} and Stoney, {Rhett J.} and Hamer, {Davidson H.} and Jose Flores-Figueroa and Emmanuel Bottieau and Connor, {Bradley A.} and Effrossyni Gkrania-Klotsas and Abraham Goorhuis and Hynes, {Noreen A.} and Michael Libman and Rogelio Lopez-Velez and McCarthy, {Anne E.} and {von Sonnenburg}, Frank and Eli Schwartz and {van Genderen}, {Perry J.J.} and {Scott Benson}, L. and Leung, {Daniel T.} and Kevin Kain and Eric Caumes and Hilmir {\`A}sgeirsson and Camilla Rothe and William Stauffer and Patricia Schlagenhauf and Phyllis Kozarsky and Jean Haulman and Carmelo Licitra and Yukiriro Yoshimura and Francois Chappuis and Frank Mockenhaupt and Sarah Borwein and Mogens Jensenius and Susan Anderson and Francesco Castelli and Lin Chen and Karin Leder and Jean Vincelette and Marc Shaw and Coyle, {Christina M.} and Paul Kelly and John Cahill and Lim, {Poh Lian} and Shuzo Kanagawa and Jan Hajek",
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AU - For the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network

AU - Michal Stevens, A.

AU - Esposito, Douglas H.

AU - Stoney, Rhett J.

AU - Hamer, Davidson H.

AU - Flores-Figueroa, Jose

AU - Bottieau, Emmanuel

AU - Connor, Bradley A.

AU - Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni

AU - Goorhuis, Abraham

AU - Hynes, Noreen A.

AU - Libman, Michael

AU - Lopez-Velez, Rogelio

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AU - Àsgeirsson, Hilmir

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AU - Stauffer, William

AU - Schlagenhauf, Patricia

AU - Kozarsky, Phyllis

AU - Haulman, Jean

AU - Licitra, Carmelo

AU - Yoshimura, Yukiriro

AU - Chappuis, Francois

AU - Mockenhaupt, Frank

AU - Borwein, Sarah

AU - Jensenius, Mogens

AU - Anderson, Susan

AU - Castelli, Francesco

AU - Chen, Lin

AU - Leder, Karin

AU - Vincelette, Jean

AU - Shaw, Marc

AU - Coyle, Christina M.

AU - Kelly, Paul

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AU - Hajek, Jan

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