Clinical implications of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins as receptor-effector couplers

A. M. Spiegel, P. Gierschik, Allen M. Spiegel, R. W. Downs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has long been known that some cellular proteins bind guanine nucleotides such as guanosine triphosphate (GTP) with high affinity. These binding proteins are called G proteins and have been linked to such critical intracellular functions as protein synthesis. In the past decade three new G proteins have been discovered that reside in the plasma membrane and transmit information from the outside to the inside of the cell. Two of these new G proteins form part of the adenylate cyclase system, a membrane-bound enzyme complex found in virtually every cell, and the third G protein is found in the disk membranes of the outer segment of the retinal rod. In this review we will discuss this new family of G proteins, beginning with their structural and functional features. We will then explore the clinical implications of G-protein abnormalities and discuss disorders, such as cholera and pseudohypoparathyroidism, that have been clearly linked to abnormalities of these proteins. In addition, we will examine other disorders that may involve G proteins, such as retinitis pigmentosa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-33
Number of pages8
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume312
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Guanine Nucleotides
GTP-Binding Proteins
Carrier Proteins
Pseudohypoparathyroidism
Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells
Proteins
Retinitis Pigmentosa
Membranes
Cholera
Guanosine Triphosphate
Adenylyl Cyclases
Cell Membrane
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Clinical implications of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins as receptor-effector couplers. / Spiegel, A. M.; Gierschik, P.; Spiegel, Allen M.; Downs, R. W.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 312, No. 1, 1985, p. 26-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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