Classic selective sweeps were rare in recent human evolution

Ryan D. Hernandez, Joanna L. Kelley, Eyal Elyashiv, S. Cord Melton, Adam Auton, Gilean McVean, Guy Sella, Molly Przeworski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

254 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Efforts to identify the genetic basis of human adaptations from polymorphism data have sought footprints of "classic selective sweeps" (in which a beneficial mutation arises and rapidly fixes in the population). Yet it remains unknown whether this form of natural selection was common in our evolution. We examined the evidence for classic sweeps in resequencing data from 179 human genomes. As expected under a recurrent-sweep model, we found that diversity levels decrease near exons and conserved noncoding regions. In contrast to expectation, however, the trough in diversity around human-specific amino acid substitutions is no more pronounced than around synonymous substitutions. Moreover, relative to the genome background, amino acid and putative regulatory sites are not significantly enriched in alleles that are highly differentiated between populations. These findings indicate that classic sweeps were not a dominant mode of human adaptation over the past ∼250,000 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)920-924
Number of pages5
JournalScience
Volume331
Issue number6019
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 18 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Genetic Selection
Medical Genetics
Human Genome
Amino Acid Substitution
Population
Exons
Alleles
Genome
Amino Acids
Mutation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Hernandez, R. D., Kelley, J. L., Elyashiv, E., Melton, S. C., Auton, A., McVean, G., ... Przeworski, M. (2011). Classic selective sweeps were rare in recent human evolution. Science, 331(6019), 920-924. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1198878

Classic selective sweeps were rare in recent human evolution. / Hernandez, Ryan D.; Kelley, Joanna L.; Elyashiv, Eyal; Melton, S. Cord; Auton, Adam; McVean, Gilean; Sella, Guy; Przeworski, Molly.

In: Science, Vol. 331, No. 6019, 18.02.2011, p. 920-924.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hernandez, RD, Kelley, JL, Elyashiv, E, Melton, SC, Auton, A, McVean, G, Sella, G & Przeworski, M 2011, 'Classic selective sweeps were rare in recent human evolution', Science, vol. 331, no. 6019, pp. 920-924. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1198878
Hernandez RD, Kelley JL, Elyashiv E, Melton SC, Auton A, McVean G et al. Classic selective sweeps were rare in recent human evolution. Science. 2011 Feb 18;331(6019):920-924. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1198878
Hernandez, Ryan D. ; Kelley, Joanna L. ; Elyashiv, Eyal ; Melton, S. Cord ; Auton, Adam ; McVean, Gilean ; Sella, Guy ; Przeworski, Molly. / Classic selective sweeps were rare in recent human evolution. In: Science. 2011 ; Vol. 331, No. 6019. pp. 920-924.
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