Chronic pediatric tracheotomy: assessment and implications for habilitation of voice, speech and language in young children

Karen W. Kaslon, Ruth E. Stein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of chronic tracheotomy on the acquisition of voice, speech, and language skills was studied. Children with chronological ages of 16 months to 41 months were evaluated for Receptive Communication Age (RCA) and Expressive Communication Age (ECA). Results indicate a consistent deviation of (on the average) 4.8 months delay in RCA and 9 months delay in ECA. An habilitation program for early intervention in voice, speech and language stimulation is described, with follow-up data on 3 children. A progression from non-meaningful, non-vocal communication to more meaningful and functional communication is noted. The evidence indicates that, without therapeutic intervention, children with tracheotomies are at risk for delays in receptive and expressive language development, as well as deficits in oral/vocal speech and voice production.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-171
Number of pages7
JournalInternational journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1985

Keywords

  • chronic tracheotomy
  • language
  • speech
  • tracheotomy
  • voice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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