Cholecystectomy and risk of metabolic syndrome

Agostino Di Ciaula, Gabriella Garruti, David Q.H. Wang, Piero Portincasa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The gallbladder physiologically concentrates and stores bile during fasting and provides rhythmic bile secretion both during fasting and in the postprandial phase to solubilize dietary lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Bile acids (BAs), major lipid components of bile, play a key role as signaling molecules in modulating gene expression related to cholesterol, BA, glucose and energy metabolism. Cholecystectomy is the most commonly performed surgical procedure worldwide in patients who develop symptoms and/or complications of cholelithiasis of any type. Cholecystectomy per se, however, might cause abnormal metabolic consequences, i.e., alterations in glucose, insulin (and insulin-resistance), lipid and lipoprotein levels, liver steatosis and the metabolic syndrome. Mechanisms are likely mediated by the abnormal transintestinal flow of BAs, producing metabolic signaling that acts without gallbladder rhythmic function and involves the BAs/farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the BA/G protein-coupled BA receptor 1 (GPBAR-1) axes in the liver, intestine, brown adipose tissue and muscle. Alterations of intestinal microbiota leading to distorted homeostatic processes are also possible. According to this view, cholecystectomy, via BA-induced changes in the enterohepatic circulation, is a risk factor for the metabolic abnormalities and becomes another “fellow traveler” with, or another risk factor for the metabolic syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEuropean Journal of Internal Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Cholecystectomy
Bile Acids and Salts
Bile
Gallbladder
Lipids
Fasting
Enterohepatic Circulation
Glucose
Brown Adipose Tissue
Cholelithiasis
Dietary Fats
Fatty Liver
GTP-Binding Proteins
Vitamins
Energy Metabolism
Lipoproteins
Intestines
Insulin Resistance
Cholesterol
Insulin

Keywords

  • Bile acids
  • Cholecystectomy
  • Cholesterol
  • Enterohepatic circulation
  • Gallbladder
  • Gallstone disease
  • Nuclear receptors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Cholecystectomy and risk of metabolic syndrome. / Di Ciaula, Agostino; Garruti, Gabriella; Wang, David Q.H.; Portincasa, Piero.

In: European Journal of Internal Medicine, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Di Ciaula, Agostino ; Garruti, Gabriella ; Wang, David Q.H. ; Portincasa, Piero. / Cholecystectomy and risk of metabolic syndrome. In: European Journal of Internal Medicine. 2018.
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