Childhood, adolescent and adult age at onset and related clinical correlates in obsessive–compulsive disorder: a report from the International College of Obsessive–Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS)

Bernardo Dell’Osso, Beatrice Benatti, Eric Hollander, Naomi Fineberg, Dan J. Stein, Christine Lochner, Humberto Nicolini, Nuria Lanzagorta, Carlotta Palazzo, A. Carlo Altamura, Donatella Marazziti, Stefano Pallanti, Michael Van Ameringen, Oguz Karamustafalioglu, Lynne M. Drummond, Luchezar Hranov, Martijn Figee, Jon E. Grant, Joseph Zohar, Damiaan DenysJose M. Menchon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Many studies suggest that age at onset (AAO) is an important factor for clinically differentiating patients with juvenile and adult onset of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). The present international study aimed to assess the prevalence of different AAO groups and compare related socio-demographic and clinical features in a large sample of OCD patients. Methods: A total of 431 OCD outpatients, participating in the ICOCS network, were first categorised in groups with childhood (≤12 years), adolescent (13–17 years) and adult-onset (≥18 years), then in pre-adult and adult onset (≥18 years) and their socio-demographic and clinical features compared. Results: Twenty-one percent (n = 92) of the sample reported childhood onset, 36% (n = 155) adolescent onset, and 43% (n = 184) adult onset. Patients with adult onset showed a significantly higher proportion of females compared with the other subgroups (χ2 =10.9, p2 =11.5; p 

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 18 2016

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Age of Onset
Demography
Outpatients

Keywords

  • Age at onset
  • cognitive behavioural therapy
  • gender
  • obsessive–compulsive disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Childhood, adolescent and adult age at onset and related clinical correlates in obsessive–compulsive disorder : a report from the International College of Obsessive–Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS). / Dell’Osso, Bernardo; Benatti, Beatrice; Hollander, Eric; Fineberg, Naomi; Stein, Dan J.; Lochner, Christine; Nicolini, Humberto; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Palazzo, Carlotta; Altamura, A. Carlo; Marazziti, Donatella; Pallanti, Stefano; Van Ameringen, Michael; Karamustafalioglu, Oguz; Drummond, Lynne M.; Hranov, Luchezar; Figee, Martijn; Grant, Jon E.; Zohar, Joseph; Denys, Damiaan; Menchon, Jose M.

In: International Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice, 18.07.2016, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dell’Osso, B, Benatti, B, Hollander, E, Fineberg, N, Stein, DJ, Lochner, C, Nicolini, H, Lanzagorta, N, Palazzo, C, Altamura, AC, Marazziti, D, Pallanti, S, Van Ameringen, M, Karamustafalioglu, O, Drummond, LM, Hranov, L, Figee, M, Grant, JE, Zohar, J, Denys, D & Menchon, JM 2016, 'Childhood, adolescent and adult age at onset and related clinical correlates in obsessive–compulsive disorder: a report from the International College of Obsessive–Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS)', International Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice, pp. 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1080/13651501.2016.1207087
Dell’Osso, Bernardo ; Benatti, Beatrice ; Hollander, Eric ; Fineberg, Naomi ; Stein, Dan J. ; Lochner, Christine ; Nicolini, Humberto ; Lanzagorta, Nuria ; Palazzo, Carlotta ; Altamura, A. Carlo ; Marazziti, Donatella ; Pallanti, Stefano ; Van Ameringen, Michael ; Karamustafalioglu, Oguz ; Drummond, Lynne M. ; Hranov, Luchezar ; Figee, Martijn ; Grant, Jon E. ; Zohar, Joseph ; Denys, Damiaan ; Menchon, Jose M. / Childhood, adolescent and adult age at onset and related clinical correlates in obsessive–compulsive disorder : a report from the International College of Obsessive–Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS). In: International Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice. 2016 ; pp. 1-8.
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AU - Lochner, Christine

AU - Nicolini, Humberto

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AU - Hranov, Luchezar

AU - Figee, Martijn

AU - Grant, Jon E.

AU - Zohar, Joseph

AU - Denys, Damiaan

AU - Menchon, Jose M.

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