Characterization of monocyte maturation/differentiation that facilitates their transmigration across the blood-brain barrier and infection by HIV: Implications for NeuroAIDS

Clarisa M. Buckner, Tina M. Calderon, Dionna W. Willams, Thomas J. Belbin, Joan W. Berman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Scopus citations

Abstract

The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV) associated neurocognitive disorders resulting from infection of the central nervous system (CNS) by HIV continues to increase despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy. Although monocytes are known to transport HIV across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) into the CNS, there are few specific markers that identify monocyte subpopulations susceptible to HIV infection and/or capable of infiltrating the CNS. We cultured human peripheral blood monocytes and characterized the expression of the phenotypic markers CD14, CD16, CD11b, Mac387, CD163, CD44v6 and CD166 during monocyte/macrophage (Mo/Mac) maturation/differentiation. We determined that a CD14+CD16+CD11b+Mac387+ Mo/Mac subpopulation preferentially transmigrates across our in vitro BBB model in response to CCL2. Genes associated with Mo/Mac subpopulations that transmigrate across the BBB and/or are infected by HIV were identified by cDNA microarray analyses. Our findings contribute to the understanding of monocyte maturation, infection and transmigration into the brain during the pathogenesis of NeuroAIDS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-123
Number of pages15
JournalCellular Immunology
Volume267
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2 2011

Keywords

  • Blood-brain barrier
  • CCL2
  • CD14
  • CD16
  • Maturation/differentiation
  • Monocytes/macrophages
  • NeuroAIDS
  • Transmigration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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