Characteristics of sharp injuries in anaesthesia providers in New York state

A cross-sectional study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Sharp instrument injury, defined as cuts, punches, scratches, nicks, or other injuries that break the skin and thus permit the entry of bacteria and viruses into the body, is the most common hazard faced by health care workers. Anaesthesiologists work in a rapid-paced environment, and are at high risk of injury from sterile sharps while preparing medication or dirty sharps that have been in contact with patients. Aim: This field study aimed to determine the incidence and distribution of sharp injuries among anaesthesia providers in New York State. Materials and Methods: The study was performed during year 2014 among the members of New York State Society of Anaesthesiologists (NYSSA). A total of 282 anaesthesia providers including anaesthesiology attendings, residents, fellow and interns participated in an anonymous online survey (Survey Monkey) of 18 questions. Results: Of 2965 NYSSA members polled, 282 anaesthesia providers responded (9.51% response rate). A total of 248 (95.04%) respondents responded a prior needlestick injury. A total of 165 (59.14%) experienced dirty sharp injury (DSI) in the course of their practice, and the most common cause was hollow bore needles. The most common cause of DSI occurred while the provider was holding the sharp himself. A total of 117 (42.4%) respondents had injury even though safety mechanism was available and used. Conclusion: Sharp injuries were a common risk to anaesthesia providers in New York State. Future research should investigate strategies to reduce injury and improve reporting among anaesthesia providers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-10
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research
Volume12
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Fingerprint

Needlestick Injuries
Anesthesiology
Anesthesia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Viruses
Health care
Needles
Hazards
Bacteria
Skin
Wounds and Injuries
Virus Internalization
Haplorhini
Delivery of Health Care
Safety
Surveys and Questionnaires
Incidence

Keywords

  • Clinical hazard
  • Needlestick injury
  • Occupational health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

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title = "Characteristics of sharp injuries in anaesthesia providers in New York state: A cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Introduction: Sharp instrument injury, defined as cuts, punches, scratches, nicks, or other injuries that break the skin and thus permit the entry of bacteria and viruses into the body, is the most common hazard faced by health care workers. Anaesthesiologists work in a rapid-paced environment, and are at high risk of injury from sterile sharps while preparing medication or dirty sharps that have been in contact with patients. Aim: This field study aimed to determine the incidence and distribution of sharp injuries among anaesthesia providers in New York State. Materials and Methods: The study was performed during year 2014 among the members of New York State Society of Anaesthesiologists (NYSSA). A total of 282 anaesthesia providers including anaesthesiology attendings, residents, fellow and interns participated in an anonymous online survey (Survey Monkey) of 18 questions. Results: Of 2965 NYSSA members polled, 282 anaesthesia providers responded (9.51{\%} response rate). A total of 248 (95.04{\%}) respondents responded a prior needlestick injury. A total of 165 (59.14{\%}) experienced dirty sharp injury (DSI) in the course of their practice, and the most common cause was hollow bore needles. The most common cause of DSI occurred while the provider was holding the sharp himself. A total of 117 (42.4{\%}) respondents had injury even though safety mechanism was available and used. Conclusion: Sharp injuries were a common risk to anaesthesia providers in New York State. Future research should investigate strategies to reduce injury and improve reporting among anaesthesia providers.",
keywords = "Clinical hazard, Needlestick injury, Occupational health",
author = "Reddy, {Shamantha G.} and Joseph, {Vilma A.} and Zhen Liu and Tracey Straker",
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T1 - Characteristics of sharp injuries in anaesthesia providers in New York state

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AU - Joseph, Vilma A.

AU - Liu, Zhen

AU - Straker, Tracey

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N2 - Introduction: Sharp instrument injury, defined as cuts, punches, scratches, nicks, or other injuries that break the skin and thus permit the entry of bacteria and viruses into the body, is the most common hazard faced by health care workers. Anaesthesiologists work in a rapid-paced environment, and are at high risk of injury from sterile sharps while preparing medication or dirty sharps that have been in contact with patients. Aim: This field study aimed to determine the incidence and distribution of sharp injuries among anaesthesia providers in New York State. Materials and Methods: The study was performed during year 2014 among the members of New York State Society of Anaesthesiologists (NYSSA). A total of 282 anaesthesia providers including anaesthesiology attendings, residents, fellow and interns participated in an anonymous online survey (Survey Monkey) of 18 questions. Results: Of 2965 NYSSA members polled, 282 anaesthesia providers responded (9.51% response rate). A total of 248 (95.04%) respondents responded a prior needlestick injury. A total of 165 (59.14%) experienced dirty sharp injury (DSI) in the course of their practice, and the most common cause was hollow bore needles. The most common cause of DSI occurred while the provider was holding the sharp himself. A total of 117 (42.4%) respondents had injury even though safety mechanism was available and used. Conclusion: Sharp injuries were a common risk to anaesthesia providers in New York State. Future research should investigate strategies to reduce injury and improve reporting among anaesthesia providers.

AB - Introduction: Sharp instrument injury, defined as cuts, punches, scratches, nicks, or other injuries that break the skin and thus permit the entry of bacteria and viruses into the body, is the most common hazard faced by health care workers. Anaesthesiologists work in a rapid-paced environment, and are at high risk of injury from sterile sharps while preparing medication or dirty sharps that have been in contact with patients. Aim: This field study aimed to determine the incidence and distribution of sharp injuries among anaesthesia providers in New York State. Materials and Methods: The study was performed during year 2014 among the members of New York State Society of Anaesthesiologists (NYSSA). A total of 282 anaesthesia providers including anaesthesiology attendings, residents, fellow and interns participated in an anonymous online survey (Survey Monkey) of 18 questions. Results: Of 2965 NYSSA members polled, 282 anaesthesia providers responded (9.51% response rate). A total of 248 (95.04%) respondents responded a prior needlestick injury. A total of 165 (59.14%) experienced dirty sharp injury (DSI) in the course of their practice, and the most common cause was hollow bore needles. The most common cause of DSI occurred while the provider was holding the sharp himself. A total of 117 (42.4%) respondents had injury even though safety mechanism was available and used. Conclusion: Sharp injuries were a common risk to anaesthesia providers in New York State. Future research should investigate strategies to reduce injury and improve reporting among anaesthesia providers.

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