Characteristics of pubertal development in a multi-ethnic population of nine-year-old girls

Julie A. Britton, Mary S. Wolff, Robert Lapinski, Joel Forman, Sarah Hochman, Geoffrey C. Kabat, James Godbold, Signe Larson, Gertrud S. Berkowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: Early age at menarche increases future disease risk. Secular decline in age at menarche has been attributed to body size characteristics, diet, and energy expenditure. Risk factors for puberty have been less frequently explored. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 186 New York Metropolitan Area, 9-year-old girls (54 African-American, 70 Hispanic, 62 Caucasians) used interviewer-administered questionnaires to assess exposures. Height and weight were measured. Pediatricians assessed pubertal development according to Tanner stages. RESULTS: African-Americans were more likely than Caucasians to have achieved puberty as determined by breast or hair development (stage 2 or higher) [age-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals = 4.91 (2.15-11.19) and 4.25 (1.85-9.77), respectively]. Pubertal development was similar among Hispanics and Caucasians. Adiposity and height were significantly positively associated with breast or hair development. More sedentary activity hours non-significantly increased the likelihood of hair development. Lower energy, but higher polyunsaturated fat, consumption were suggestive of an association with breast development. Vitamin C and hair development were inversely related. No other nutrients or physical activity measures were related to pubertal development. CONCLUSIONS: Results are consistent with height and adiposity being associated with pubertal development. Sedentary activity or diet might possibly influence maturation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-187
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Epidemiology
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hair
Breast
Menarche
Adiposity
Puberty
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Population
Diet
Body Size
Energy Metabolism
Ascorbic Acid
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fats
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Interviews
Exercise
Weights and Measures
Food

Keywords

  • Body Size Characteristics
  • Cross-sectional
  • Diet
  • Menarche
  • Physical Activity
  • Puberty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Britton, J. A., Wolff, M. S., Lapinski, R., Forman, J., Hochman, S., Kabat, G. C., ... Berkowitz, G. S. (2004). Characteristics of pubertal development in a multi-ethnic population of nine-year-old girls. Annals of Epidemiology, 14(3), 179-187. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2002.08.001

Characteristics of pubertal development in a multi-ethnic population of nine-year-old girls. / Britton, Julie A.; Wolff, Mary S.; Lapinski, Robert; Forman, Joel; Hochman, Sarah; Kabat, Geoffrey C.; Godbold, James; Larson, Signe; Berkowitz, Gertrud S.

In: Annals of Epidemiology, Vol. 14, No. 3, 03.2004, p. 179-187.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Britton, JA, Wolff, MS, Lapinski, R, Forman, J, Hochman, S, Kabat, GC, Godbold, J, Larson, S & Berkowitz, GS 2004, 'Characteristics of pubertal development in a multi-ethnic population of nine-year-old girls', Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 179-187. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2002.08.001
Britton, Julie A. ; Wolff, Mary S. ; Lapinski, Robert ; Forman, Joel ; Hochman, Sarah ; Kabat, Geoffrey C. ; Godbold, James ; Larson, Signe ; Berkowitz, Gertrud S. / Characteristics of pubertal development in a multi-ethnic population of nine-year-old girls. In: Annals of Epidemiology. 2004 ; Vol. 14, No. 3. pp. 179-187.
@article{dd46ea1c66174ca3979e23d63b0a87b7,
title = "Characteristics of pubertal development in a multi-ethnic population of nine-year-old girls",
abstract = "PURPOSE: Early age at menarche increases future disease risk. Secular decline in age at menarche has been attributed to body size characteristics, diet, and energy expenditure. Risk factors for puberty have been less frequently explored. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 186 New York Metropolitan Area, 9-year-old girls (54 African-American, 70 Hispanic, 62 Caucasians) used interviewer-administered questionnaires to assess exposures. Height and weight were measured. Pediatricians assessed pubertal development according to Tanner stages. RESULTS: African-Americans were more likely than Caucasians to have achieved puberty as determined by breast or hair development (stage 2 or higher) [age-adjusted odds ratios and 95{\%} confidence intervals = 4.91 (2.15-11.19) and 4.25 (1.85-9.77), respectively]. Pubertal development was similar among Hispanics and Caucasians. Adiposity and height were significantly positively associated with breast or hair development. More sedentary activity hours non-significantly increased the likelihood of hair development. Lower energy, but higher polyunsaturated fat, consumption were suggestive of an association with breast development. Vitamin C and hair development were inversely related. No other nutrients or physical activity measures were related to pubertal development. CONCLUSIONS: Results are consistent with height and adiposity being associated with pubertal development. Sedentary activity or diet might possibly influence maturation.",
keywords = "Body Size Characteristics, Cross-sectional, Diet, Menarche, Physical Activity, Puberty",
author = "Britton, {Julie A.} and Wolff, {Mary S.} and Robert Lapinski and Joel Forman and Sarah Hochman and Kabat, {Geoffrey C.} and James Godbold and Signe Larson and Berkowitz, {Gertrud S.}",
year = "2004",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.annepidem.2002.08.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "179--187",
journal = "Annals of Epidemiology",
issn = "1047-2797",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characteristics of pubertal development in a multi-ethnic population of nine-year-old girls

AU - Britton, Julie A.

AU - Wolff, Mary S.

AU - Lapinski, Robert

AU - Forman, Joel

AU - Hochman, Sarah

AU - Kabat, Geoffrey C.

AU - Godbold, James

AU - Larson, Signe

AU - Berkowitz, Gertrud S.

PY - 2004/3

Y1 - 2004/3

N2 - PURPOSE: Early age at menarche increases future disease risk. Secular decline in age at menarche has been attributed to body size characteristics, diet, and energy expenditure. Risk factors for puberty have been less frequently explored. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 186 New York Metropolitan Area, 9-year-old girls (54 African-American, 70 Hispanic, 62 Caucasians) used interviewer-administered questionnaires to assess exposures. Height and weight were measured. Pediatricians assessed pubertal development according to Tanner stages. RESULTS: African-Americans were more likely than Caucasians to have achieved puberty as determined by breast or hair development (stage 2 or higher) [age-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals = 4.91 (2.15-11.19) and 4.25 (1.85-9.77), respectively]. Pubertal development was similar among Hispanics and Caucasians. Adiposity and height were significantly positively associated with breast or hair development. More sedentary activity hours non-significantly increased the likelihood of hair development. Lower energy, but higher polyunsaturated fat, consumption were suggestive of an association with breast development. Vitamin C and hair development were inversely related. No other nutrients or physical activity measures were related to pubertal development. CONCLUSIONS: Results are consistent with height and adiposity being associated with pubertal development. Sedentary activity or diet might possibly influence maturation.

AB - PURPOSE: Early age at menarche increases future disease risk. Secular decline in age at menarche has been attributed to body size characteristics, diet, and energy expenditure. Risk factors for puberty have been less frequently explored. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 186 New York Metropolitan Area, 9-year-old girls (54 African-American, 70 Hispanic, 62 Caucasians) used interviewer-administered questionnaires to assess exposures. Height and weight were measured. Pediatricians assessed pubertal development according to Tanner stages. RESULTS: African-Americans were more likely than Caucasians to have achieved puberty as determined by breast or hair development (stage 2 or higher) [age-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals = 4.91 (2.15-11.19) and 4.25 (1.85-9.77), respectively]. Pubertal development was similar among Hispanics and Caucasians. Adiposity and height were significantly positively associated with breast or hair development. More sedentary activity hours non-significantly increased the likelihood of hair development. Lower energy, but higher polyunsaturated fat, consumption were suggestive of an association with breast development. Vitamin C and hair development were inversely related. No other nutrients or physical activity measures were related to pubertal development. CONCLUSIONS: Results are consistent with height and adiposity being associated with pubertal development. Sedentary activity or diet might possibly influence maturation.

KW - Body Size Characteristics

KW - Cross-sectional

KW - Diet

KW - Menarche

KW - Physical Activity

KW - Puberty

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1342324119&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1342324119&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.annepidem.2002.08.001

DO - 10.1016/j.annepidem.2002.08.001

M3 - Article

VL - 14

SP - 179

EP - 187

JO - Annals of Epidemiology

JF - Annals of Epidemiology

SN - 1047-2797

IS - 3

ER -