Characteristics of emergency department patients who receive a palliative care consultation

Corita R. Grudzen, Ula Hwang, Jason A. Cohen, Michael Fischman, R. Sean Morrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A large gap exists between the practice of emergency medicine and palliative care. Although hospice and palliative medicine has recently been recognized as a subspecialty of emergency medicine, few palliative care teams routinely interact with emergency providers, and primary palliative care skills among emergency providers are lacking. Objective: To identify the proportion and characteristics of patients who receive a palliative care consultation and arrive via the emergency department (ED). Methods: A descriptive study of adult ED patients from an urban, academic tertiary care hospital who received a palliative care consultation in January 2005 or January 2009. Results: In January 2005, 100 of the 161 consults (62%) arrived via the ED versus 63 of 124 consults (51%) in January 2009 (p=0.06). Mean days from admission to consultation in January 2005 were six days (standard deviation 11), versus nine days (SD 26) in January 2009 (p=0.35). Three of the 100 consultations (3%) in January 2005 were initiated in the ED, versus 4 of the 64 (6%) in January 2009. Conclusions: At an urban academic medical center with a well-developed palliative care service, the majority of palliative care consultations were for patients who arrive via the ED. Despite this, only a small minority of consultations originated from emergency providers and consultation was on average initiated days into a patient's hospital stay.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-399
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Palliative Medicine
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Palliative Care
Hospital Emergency Service
Referral and Consultation
Emergencies
Emergency Medicine
Hospices
Emergency Medical Services
Tertiary Healthcare
Tertiary Care Centers
Length of Stay
Primary Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Characteristics of emergency department patients who receive a palliative care consultation. / Grudzen, Corita R.; Hwang, Ula; Cohen, Jason A.; Fischman, Michael; Morrison, R. Sean.

In: Journal of Palliative Medicine, Vol. 15, No. 4, 01.04.2012, p. 396-399.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grudzen, Corita R. ; Hwang, Ula ; Cohen, Jason A. ; Fischman, Michael ; Morrison, R. Sean. / Characteristics of emergency department patients who receive a palliative care consultation. In: Journal of Palliative Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 396-399.
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