Chaperone-mediated autophagy

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) is the only type of autophagy in mammalian cells able to selectively degrade cytosolic proteins in lysosomes. CMA is maximally activated in response to stressors such as prolonged starvation, exposure to toxic compounds, or oxidative stress. We have found that CMA activity decreases in aging and in some age-related disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Impaired CMA under these conditions may be responsible for the accumulation of damaged proteins inside cells and for their higher vulnerability to stressors. In contrast to other forms of autophagy, where substrates are engulfed or sequestered along with other cytosolic components, CMA substrates are translocated one-by-one across the lysosomal membrane. Changes in the levels/activity of the lysosomal components required for substrate translocation can be used to stimulate CMA activity. However, the most unequivocal method to measure CMA is by directly tracking the translocation of substrate proteins into isolated lysosomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology
PublisherHumana Press
Pages227-244
Number of pages18
Volume445
ISBN (Print)9781588298539
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume445
ISSN (Print)10643745

Fingerprint

Autophagy
Lysosomes
Poisons
Protein Transport
Starvation
Parkinson Disease
Proteins
Oxidative Stress
Membranes

Keywords

  • Chaperones
  • Lysosomal membrane proteins
  • Lysosomes
  • Metabolic labeling
  • Protease protection assay

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Kaushik, S., & Cuervo, A. M. (2008). Chaperone-mediated autophagy. In Methods in Molecular Biology (Vol. 445, pp. 227-244). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 445). Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-157-4_15

Chaperone-mediated autophagy. / Kaushik, Susmita; Cuervo, Ana Maria.

Methods in Molecular Biology. Vol. 445 Humana Press, 2008. p. 227-244 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 445).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kaushik, S & Cuervo, AM 2008, Chaperone-mediated autophagy. in Methods in Molecular Biology. vol. 445, Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 445, Humana Press, pp. 227-244. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-157-4_15
Kaushik S, Cuervo AM. Chaperone-mediated autophagy. In Methods in Molecular Biology. Vol. 445. Humana Press. 2008. p. 227-244. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-157-4_15
Kaushik, Susmita ; Cuervo, Ana Maria. / Chaperone-mediated autophagy. Methods in Molecular Biology. Vol. 445 Humana Press, 2008. pp. 227-244 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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