Changing status of academic emergency medicine (1991-1996)

E. John Gallagher, Mary Ann Schropp, Philip L. Henneman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: An SAEM national task force previously concluded that academic departments and residencies in emergency medicine (EM) had preferentially developed outside of the academic mainstream. This study was designed to determine whether EM has made significant inroads into academic medical centers over the past 5 years. Methods: The baseline data set (7/1/91) contained all 126 Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME)- accredited schools, and all 87 Residency Review Committee (RRC)-accredited EM residencies. The comparison data set (7/1/96) contained all 124 LCME- accredited schools, and all 114 RRC-accredited EM residencies. The 1991-96 increment in academic departments and university-hospital residencies was examined in the aggregate, then stratified by medical schools grouped into quartiles and contiguous quartiles, according to academic ranking. A-priori and post-hoc comparisons were expressed with 95% and 99% confidence intervals (CIs), respectively. Results: Over the past 5 years, the proportion of academic departments of EM increased by 23%, from 18% to 41% of all LCME-accredited schools (95% CI 12% to 34%). The largest increase (58%; 99% CI 40% to 77%) occurred among those schools academically ranked above the median. The proportion of EM residencies at university hospitals increased by 17%, from 40% to 57% (95% CI 5% to 30%). Again, the largest increase (25%; 99% CI 3% to 47%) occurred at university hospitals affiliated with schools academically ranked above the median. Conclusion: EM has made substantial inroads into academic medical centers over the past 5 years. This is reflected in quantitatively and statistically significant increases in academic departments and university-hospital residency programs, both occurring largely within institutions whose academic rankings place them among the upper half of all LCME-accredited medical schools.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)746-751
Number of pages6
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume4
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1997

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Emergency Medicine
Internship and Residency
Medical Education
Confidence Intervals
Advisory Committees
Medical Schools

Keywords

  • Academic medical centers
  • Academic status
  • Medical schools
  • Methodology
  • National Institutes of Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Changing status of academic emergency medicine (1991-1996). / Gallagher, E. John; Schropp, Mary Ann; Henneman, Philip L.

In: Academic Emergency Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 7, 1997, p. 746-751.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gallagher, EJ, Schropp, MA & Henneman, PL 1997, 'Changing status of academic emergency medicine (1991-1996)', Academic Emergency Medicine, vol. 4, no. 7, pp. 746-751.
Gallagher, E. John ; Schropp, Mary Ann ; Henneman, Philip L. / Changing status of academic emergency medicine (1991-1996). In: Academic Emergency Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 4, No. 7. pp. 746-751.
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abstract = "Objective: An SAEM national task force previously concluded that academic departments and residencies in emergency medicine (EM) had preferentially developed outside of the academic mainstream. This study was designed to determine whether EM has made significant inroads into academic medical centers over the past 5 years. Methods: The baseline data set (7/1/91) contained all 126 Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME)- accredited schools, and all 87 Residency Review Committee (RRC)-accredited EM residencies. The comparison data set (7/1/96) contained all 124 LCME- accredited schools, and all 114 RRC-accredited EM residencies. The 1991-96 increment in academic departments and university-hospital residencies was examined in the aggregate, then stratified by medical schools grouped into quartiles and contiguous quartiles, according to academic ranking. A-priori and post-hoc comparisons were expressed with 95{\%} and 99{\%} confidence intervals (CIs), respectively. Results: Over the past 5 years, the proportion of academic departments of EM increased by 23{\%}, from 18{\%} to 41{\%} of all LCME-accredited schools (95{\%} CI 12{\%} to 34{\%}). The largest increase (58{\%}; 99{\%} CI 40{\%} to 77{\%}) occurred among those schools academically ranked above the median. The proportion of EM residencies at university hospitals increased by 17{\%}, from 40{\%} to 57{\%} (95{\%} CI 5{\%} to 30{\%}). Again, the largest increase (25{\%}; 99{\%} CI 3{\%} to 47{\%}) occurred at university hospitals affiliated with schools academically ranked above the median. Conclusion: EM has made substantial inroads into academic medical centers over the past 5 years. This is reflected in quantitatively and statistically significant increases in academic departments and university-hospital residency programs, both occurring largely within institutions whose academic rankings place them among the upper half of all LCME-accredited medical schools.",
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