Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Motoric Cognitive Risk Syndrome: Results from the Kerala-Einstein Study

Nan Wang, Gilles Allali, Chandrasekharan Kesavadas, Mohan L. Noone, Vayyattu G. Pradeep, Helena M. Blumen, Joe Verghese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The contribution of cerebral small vessel disease to cognitive decline, especially in non-Caucasian populations, is not well established. Objective:We examined the relationship between cerebral small vessel disease and motoric cognitive risk syndrome (MCR), a recently described pre-dementia syndrome, in Indian seniors. Methods: 139 participants (mean age 66.6±5.4 y, 33.1% female) participating in the Kerala-Einstein study in Southern India were examined in a cross-sectional study. The presence of cerebral small vessel disease (lacunar infarcts and cerebral microbleeds (CMB)) and white matter hyperintensities on MRI was ascertained by raters blinded to clinical information. MCR was defined by the presence of cognitive complaints and slow gait in older adults without dementia or mobility disability. Results: Thirty-eight (27.3%) participants met MCR criteria. The overall prevalence of lacunar infarcts and CMB was 49.6% and 9.4%, respectively. Lacunar infarcts in the frontal lobe, but no other brain regions, were associated with MCR even after adjusting for vascular risk factors and presence of white matter hyperintensities (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR): 4.67, 95% CI: 1.69-12.94). Frontal lacunar infarcts were associated with slow gait (aOR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.46-10.79) and poor performance on memory test (α: -1.24, 95% CI: -2.42 to -0.05), but not with cognitive complaints or non-memory tests. No association of CMB was found with MCR, individual MCR criterion or cognitive tests. Conclusions: Frontal lacunar infarcts are associated with MCR in Indian seniors, perhaps, by contributing to slow gait and poor memory function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)699-707
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2 2016

Fingerprint

Cerebral Small Vessel Diseases
Lacunar Stroke
Gait
Dementia
Odds Ratio
Frontal Lobe
India
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Aging
  • cerebral small vessel diseases
  • cognition
  • frontal lobe
  • gait
  • lacunar infarct
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Motoric Cognitive Risk Syndrome : Results from the Kerala-Einstein Study. / Wang, Nan; Allali, Gilles; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Noone, Mohan L.; Pradeep, Vayyattu G.; Blumen, Helena M.; Verghese, Joe.

In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, Vol. 50, No. 3, 02.02.2016, p. 699-707.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Nan ; Allali, Gilles ; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan ; Noone, Mohan L. ; Pradeep, Vayyattu G. ; Blumen, Helena M. ; Verghese, Joe. / Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Motoric Cognitive Risk Syndrome : Results from the Kerala-Einstein Study. In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. 2016 ; Vol. 50, No. 3. pp. 699-707.
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abstract = "Background: The contribution of cerebral small vessel disease to cognitive decline, especially in non-Caucasian populations, is not well established. Objective:We examined the relationship between cerebral small vessel disease and motoric cognitive risk syndrome (MCR), a recently described pre-dementia syndrome, in Indian seniors. Methods: 139 participants (mean age 66.6±5.4 y, 33.1{\%} female) participating in the Kerala-Einstein study in Southern India were examined in a cross-sectional study. The presence of cerebral small vessel disease (lacunar infarcts and cerebral microbleeds (CMB)) and white matter hyperintensities on MRI was ascertained by raters blinded to clinical information. MCR was defined by the presence of cognitive complaints and slow gait in older adults without dementia or mobility disability. Results: Thirty-eight (27.3{\%}) participants met MCR criteria. The overall prevalence of lacunar infarcts and CMB was 49.6{\%} and 9.4{\%}, respectively. Lacunar infarcts in the frontal lobe, but no other brain regions, were associated with MCR even after adjusting for vascular risk factors and presence of white matter hyperintensities (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR): 4.67, 95{\%} CI: 1.69-12.94). Frontal lacunar infarcts were associated with slow gait (aOR: 3.98, 95{\%} CI: 1.46-10.79) and poor performance on memory test (α: -1.24, 95{\%} CI: -2.42 to -0.05), but not with cognitive complaints or non-memory tests. No association of CMB was found with MCR, individual MCR criterion or cognitive tests. Conclusions: Frontal lacunar infarcts are associated with MCR in Indian seniors, perhaps, by contributing to slow gait and poor memory function.",
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AU - Wang, Nan

AU - Allali, Gilles

AU - Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan

AU - Noone, Mohan L.

AU - Pradeep, Vayyattu G.

AU - Blumen, Helena M.

AU - Verghese, Joe

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KW - magnetic resonance imaging

KW - memory

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