CD1 proteins: Targets of T cell recognition in innate and adaptive immunity

T. Ulrichs, Steven A. Porcelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The CD1 family consists of antigen presenting molecules encoded by genes located outside of the major histocompatibility complex. CD1 proteins are conserved among mammalian species and are expressed on the surface of cells involved in antigen presentation. The CD1 system has been shown to be involved in activation of cell-mediated responses, and T cells specific for either CD1 molecules or antigens presented by CD1 have been isolated. Structural and biochemical analyses demonstrate that antigens presented by CD1 are nonpeptide lipid or glycolipid structures, including examples found in the cell walls of pathogenic mycobacteria. The hydrophobic part of these antigens most likely binds in the CD1 ligand-binding groove, whereas the polar headgroup of these antigens appears to make direct contact with the T cell receptor and determines specific recognition. Presentation of antigens by CD1 molecules requires uptake and intracellular processing by antigen presenting cells and can be achieved for both exogenous and endogenous antigens. T cells recognizing CD1 restricted antigens have a broad range of functional activities that suggest that the CD1 system is involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses against microbial infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)416-432
Number of pages17
JournalReviews in Immunogenetics
Volume2
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

CD1 Antigens
Adaptive Immunity
Innate Immunity
T-Lymphocytes
Antigens
Antigen Presentation
Proteins
Glycolipids
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Mycobacterium
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Cell Wall
Ligands
Lipids
Infection
Genes

Keywords

  • γδ T cells
  • CD1
  • Lipid and glycolipid antigens
  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  • NK T cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Genetics

Cite this

CD1 proteins : Targets of T cell recognition in innate and adaptive immunity. / Ulrichs, T.; Porcelli, Steven A.

In: Reviews in Immunogenetics, Vol. 2, No. 3, 2000, p. 416-432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4caf339dee2d41b6a39f1aea4817ce19,
title = "CD1 proteins: Targets of T cell recognition in innate and adaptive immunity",
abstract = "The CD1 family consists of antigen presenting molecules encoded by genes located outside of the major histocompatibility complex. CD1 proteins are conserved among mammalian species and are expressed on the surface of cells involved in antigen presentation. The CD1 system has been shown to be involved in activation of cell-mediated responses, and T cells specific for either CD1 molecules or antigens presented by CD1 have been isolated. Structural and biochemical analyses demonstrate that antigens presented by CD1 are nonpeptide lipid or glycolipid structures, including examples found in the cell walls of pathogenic mycobacteria. The hydrophobic part of these antigens most likely binds in the CD1 ligand-binding groove, whereas the polar headgroup of these antigens appears to make direct contact with the T cell receptor and determines specific recognition. Presentation of antigens by CD1 molecules requires uptake and intracellular processing by antigen presenting cells and can be achieved for both exogenous and endogenous antigens. T cells recognizing CD1 restricted antigens have a broad range of functional activities that suggest that the CD1 system is involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses against microbial infections.",
keywords = "γδ T cells, CD1, Lipid and glycolipid antigens, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, NK T cells",
author = "T. Ulrichs and Porcelli, {Steven A.}",
year = "2000",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "416--432",
journal = "Reviews in Immunogenetics",
issn = "1398-1714",
publisher = "Munksgaard International Publishers",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - CD1 proteins

T2 - Targets of T cell recognition in innate and adaptive immunity

AU - Ulrichs, T.

AU - Porcelli, Steven A.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - The CD1 family consists of antigen presenting molecules encoded by genes located outside of the major histocompatibility complex. CD1 proteins are conserved among mammalian species and are expressed on the surface of cells involved in antigen presentation. The CD1 system has been shown to be involved in activation of cell-mediated responses, and T cells specific for either CD1 molecules or antigens presented by CD1 have been isolated. Structural and biochemical analyses demonstrate that antigens presented by CD1 are nonpeptide lipid or glycolipid structures, including examples found in the cell walls of pathogenic mycobacteria. The hydrophobic part of these antigens most likely binds in the CD1 ligand-binding groove, whereas the polar headgroup of these antigens appears to make direct contact with the T cell receptor and determines specific recognition. Presentation of antigens by CD1 molecules requires uptake and intracellular processing by antigen presenting cells and can be achieved for both exogenous and endogenous antigens. T cells recognizing CD1 restricted antigens have a broad range of functional activities that suggest that the CD1 system is involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses against microbial infections.

AB - The CD1 family consists of antigen presenting molecules encoded by genes located outside of the major histocompatibility complex. CD1 proteins are conserved among mammalian species and are expressed on the surface of cells involved in antigen presentation. The CD1 system has been shown to be involved in activation of cell-mediated responses, and T cells specific for either CD1 molecules or antigens presented by CD1 have been isolated. Structural and biochemical analyses demonstrate that antigens presented by CD1 are nonpeptide lipid or glycolipid structures, including examples found in the cell walls of pathogenic mycobacteria. The hydrophobic part of these antigens most likely binds in the CD1 ligand-binding groove, whereas the polar headgroup of these antigens appears to make direct contact with the T cell receptor and determines specific recognition. Presentation of antigens by CD1 molecules requires uptake and intracellular processing by antigen presenting cells and can be achieved for both exogenous and endogenous antigens. T cells recognizing CD1 restricted antigens have a broad range of functional activities that suggest that the CD1 system is involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses against microbial infections.

KW - γδ T cells

KW - CD1

KW - Lipid and glycolipid antigens

KW - Mycobacterium tuberculosis

KW - NK T cells

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034523480&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034523480&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11256748

AN - SCOPUS:0034523480

VL - 2

SP - 416

EP - 432

JO - Reviews in Immunogenetics

JF - Reviews in Immunogenetics

SN - 1398-1714

IS - 3

ER -