Cash transfers to increase Antenatal care utilization in Kisoro, Uganda: A pilot study

Chava Kahn, Moses Iraguha, Michael Baganizi, Giselle E. Kolenic, Gerald A. Paccione, Jr., Nergesh Tejani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The World Health Organization recommends four antenatal visits for pregnant women in developing countries. Cash transfers have been used to incentivize participation in health services. We examined whether modest cash transfers for participation in antenatal care would increase antenatal care attendance and delivery in a health facility in Kisoro, Uganda. Twenty-three villages were randomized into four groups: 1) no cash; 2) 0.20 United States Dollars (USD) for each of four visits; 3) 0.40 USD for a single first trimester visit only; 4) 0.40 USD for each of four visits. Outcomes were three or more antenatal visits and delivery in a health facility. Chi-square, analysis of variance, and generalized estimating equation analyses were performed to detect differences in outcomes. Women in the 0.40 USD/visit group had higher odds of three or more antenatal visits than the control group (OR 1.70, 95% CI: 1.13-2.57). The odds of delivering in a health facility did not differ between groups. However, women with more antenatal visits had higher odds of delivering in a health facility (OR 1.21, 95% CI: 1.03-1.42). These findings are important in an area where maternal mortality is high, utilization of health services is low, and resources are scarce.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)144-150
Number of pages7
JournalAfrican journal of reproductive health
Volume19
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Uganda
Prenatal Care
Health Facilities
Health Services
Maternal Mortality
First Pregnancy Trimester
Developing Countries
Pregnant Women
Analysis of Variance
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Reproductive Medicine

Cite this

Cash transfers to increase Antenatal care utilization in Kisoro, Uganda : A pilot study. / Kahn, Chava; Iraguha, Moses; Baganizi, Michael; Kolenic, Giselle E.; Paccione, Jr., Gerald A.; Tejani, Nergesh.

In: African journal of reproductive health, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.09.2015, p. 144-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kahn, C, Iraguha, M, Baganizi, M, Kolenic, GE, Paccione, Jr., GA & Tejani, N 2015, 'Cash transfers to increase Antenatal care utilization in Kisoro, Uganda: A pilot study', African journal of reproductive health, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 144-150.
Kahn, Chava ; Iraguha, Moses ; Baganizi, Michael ; Kolenic, Giselle E. ; Paccione, Jr., Gerald A. ; Tejani, Nergesh. / Cash transfers to increase Antenatal care utilization in Kisoro, Uganda : A pilot study. In: African journal of reproductive health. 2015 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 144-150.
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