Cardiac troponin i after cardiopulmonary bypass in infants in comparison with older children

Monesha Gupta-Malhotra, Jeffrey H. Kern, Patrick A. Flynn, Myles S. Schiller, Jan M. Quaegebeur, Deborah M. Friedman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective At the present time, there is a trend towards performing open heart surgery at a younger age. Myocardium of infants has been thought to be more vulnerable to cardiopulmonary bypass in comparison with adults. For this study, we evaluated the degree of myocardial injury by measurement of cardiac troponin levels in infants in comparison with older children for similar surgeries. Methods Serum was collected before bypass, after bypass, and daily after surgery and serum cardiac troponin I level (micrograms per litre). The demographic data, cardiac diagnoses, types of surgery performed, and peri-operative parameters were collected. Results Of the 21 children enrolled consecutively, five were infants. Among the 21 patients, four patients had post-operative peak troponin values greater than 100 (three were infants) and all four patients survived and had normal left ventricular systolic function upon discharge echocardiogram. The five infants had peak troponin levels of 222.3, 202, 129, 26.7, and 82.3. The post-operative peak troponin levels were significantly higher in infants (mean 132.5 with a standard deviation of 81.6) than in the older children (mean 40.3 with a standard deviation of 33.4), although there was no significant difference in bypass time, bypass temperature, cross-clamp time, or the length of stay in the intensive care unit between the two age groups. Conclusions Higher troponin release is seen in infants in comparison with older children after bypass for similar surgeries. A troponin level greater than 100 after bypass does not necessarily predict death or a severe cardiovascular event in the very young.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)431-435
Number of pages5
JournalCardiology in the Young
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Open heart surgery
  • congenital cardiac malformations
  • congenital heart surgery
  • cyanosis
  • myocardial ischaemia
  • paediatric

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this