Cardiac catheterization in infants weighing less than 1,500 grams

Nicole J. Sutton, James E. Lock, Robert L. Geggel

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The improved survival of very low-birth-weight (<1,500 g) infants justifies more aggressive attempts to treat underlying congenital heart disease than in the past. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all catheterizations performed at our institution between January 1, 1990 and June 1, 2004 in infants weighing <1,500 g. We performed a 3:1 case-control study. Comparisons were randomly selected from a group of patients catheterized within 6 months of the cases and weighing 2-3 kg. All catheterization data, angiograms, and hospital charts were reviewed. Results: Eighteen patients weighing <1,500 g underwent catheterization. Fifty-four patients were selected as comparisons. There were no significant differences in the age at catheterization, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, or contrast amount (cc/kg). The lower-birthweight infants were more likely to be premature (median age 29 vs. 37 weeks, P < 0.001), and to have left-sided obstructive lesions including aortic stenosis or coarctation. The comparison patients were more likely to be postoperative (28% vs. 0%, P = 0.02), and included a higher number with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. There was an increased incidence of interventions performed in the lower-birth-weight infants (83% vs. 41%, P = 0.002). There was a difference in the interventions performed between the two groups: the comparisons had more atrial septal procedures, and the lower-birth-weight infants had more coarctation dilations and aortic valve dilations. There were no significant differences in the acute success rate of the procedures (100% vs. 95%), overall complication rate (56 vs. 57%), incidence of blood transfusions (44 vs. 30%), or major complications (11 vs. 13%) between the lower-birth-weight and comparison groups respectively. There was a trend towards higher survival rate in the comparison group in this small study population, but it did not reach significance (80 vs. 61%, P = 0.13). Conclusions: Cardiac catheterization in neonates <1,500 g is more likely to include percutaneous intervention, especially on the left side, but is generally successful with a complication rate similar to procedures performed in larger infants. Although these procedures are rare, improved miniaturization of equipment would facilitate safer interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)948-956
Number of pages9
JournalCatheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume68
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cardiac Catheterization
Catheterization
Birth Weight
Dilatation
Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome
Miniaturization
Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Aortic Coarctation
Fluoroscopy
Aortic Valve Stenosis
Incidence
Aortic Valve
Blood Transfusion
Case-Control Studies
Heart Diseases
Angiography
Survival Rate
Newborn Infant
Equipment and Supplies
Survival

Keywords

  • Pediatric cardiac catheterization
  • Pediatric catheterization complication
  • Pediatric interventional catheterization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Cardiac catheterization in infants weighing less than 1,500 grams. / Sutton, Nicole J.; Lock, James E.; Geggel, Robert L.

In: Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, Vol. 68, No. 6, 12.2006, p. 948-956.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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abstract = "Background: The improved survival of very low-birth-weight (<1,500 g) infants justifies more aggressive attempts to treat underlying congenital heart disease than in the past. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all catheterizations performed at our institution between January 1, 1990 and June 1, 2004 in infants weighing <1,500 g. We performed a 3:1 case-control study. Comparisons were randomly selected from a group of patients catheterized within 6 months of the cases and weighing 2-3 kg. All catheterization data, angiograms, and hospital charts were reviewed. Results: Eighteen patients weighing <1,500 g underwent catheterization. Fifty-four patients were selected as comparisons. There were no significant differences in the age at catheterization, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, or contrast amount (cc/kg). The lower-birthweight infants were more likely to be premature (median age 29 vs. 37 weeks, P < 0.001), and to have left-sided obstructive lesions including aortic stenosis or coarctation. The comparison patients were more likely to be postoperative (28{\%} vs. 0{\%}, P = 0.02), and included a higher number with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. There was an increased incidence of interventions performed in the lower-birth-weight infants (83{\%} vs. 41{\%}, P = 0.002). There was a difference in the interventions performed between the two groups: the comparisons had more atrial septal procedures, and the lower-birth-weight infants had more coarctation dilations and aortic valve dilations. There were no significant differences in the acute success rate of the procedures (100{\%} vs. 95{\%}), overall complication rate (56 vs. 57{\%}), incidence of blood transfusions (44 vs. 30{\%}), or major complications (11 vs. 13{\%}) between the lower-birth-weight and comparison groups respectively. There was a trend towards higher survival rate in the comparison group in this small study population, but it did not reach significance (80 vs. 61{\%}, P = 0.13). Conclusions: Cardiac catheterization in neonates <1,500 g is more likely to include percutaneous intervention, especially on the left side, but is generally successful with a complication rate similar to procedures performed in larger infants. Although these procedures are rare, improved miniaturization of equipment would facilitate safer interventions.",
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AU - Sutton, Nicole J.

AU - Lock, James E.

AU - Geggel, Robert L.

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N2 - Background: The improved survival of very low-birth-weight (<1,500 g) infants justifies more aggressive attempts to treat underlying congenital heart disease than in the past. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all catheterizations performed at our institution between January 1, 1990 and June 1, 2004 in infants weighing <1,500 g. We performed a 3:1 case-control study. Comparisons were randomly selected from a group of patients catheterized within 6 months of the cases and weighing 2-3 kg. All catheterization data, angiograms, and hospital charts were reviewed. Results: Eighteen patients weighing <1,500 g underwent catheterization. Fifty-four patients were selected as comparisons. There were no significant differences in the age at catheterization, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, or contrast amount (cc/kg). The lower-birthweight infants were more likely to be premature (median age 29 vs. 37 weeks, P < 0.001), and to have left-sided obstructive lesions including aortic stenosis or coarctation. The comparison patients were more likely to be postoperative (28% vs. 0%, P = 0.02), and included a higher number with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. There was an increased incidence of interventions performed in the lower-birth-weight infants (83% vs. 41%, P = 0.002). There was a difference in the interventions performed between the two groups: the comparisons had more atrial septal procedures, and the lower-birth-weight infants had more coarctation dilations and aortic valve dilations. There were no significant differences in the acute success rate of the procedures (100% vs. 95%), overall complication rate (56 vs. 57%), incidence of blood transfusions (44 vs. 30%), or major complications (11 vs. 13%) between the lower-birth-weight and comparison groups respectively. There was a trend towards higher survival rate in the comparison group in this small study population, but it did not reach significance (80 vs. 61%, P = 0.13). Conclusions: Cardiac catheterization in neonates <1,500 g is more likely to include percutaneous intervention, especially on the left side, but is generally successful with a complication rate similar to procedures performed in larger infants. Although these procedures are rare, improved miniaturization of equipment would facilitate safer interventions.

AB - Background: The improved survival of very low-birth-weight (<1,500 g) infants justifies more aggressive attempts to treat underlying congenital heart disease than in the past. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all catheterizations performed at our institution between January 1, 1990 and June 1, 2004 in infants weighing <1,500 g. We performed a 3:1 case-control study. Comparisons were randomly selected from a group of patients catheterized within 6 months of the cases and weighing 2-3 kg. All catheterization data, angiograms, and hospital charts were reviewed. Results: Eighteen patients weighing <1,500 g underwent catheterization. Fifty-four patients were selected as comparisons. There were no significant differences in the age at catheterization, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, or contrast amount (cc/kg). The lower-birthweight infants were more likely to be premature (median age 29 vs. 37 weeks, P < 0.001), and to have left-sided obstructive lesions including aortic stenosis or coarctation. The comparison patients were more likely to be postoperative (28% vs. 0%, P = 0.02), and included a higher number with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. There was an increased incidence of interventions performed in the lower-birth-weight infants (83% vs. 41%, P = 0.002). There was a difference in the interventions performed between the two groups: the comparisons had more atrial septal procedures, and the lower-birth-weight infants had more coarctation dilations and aortic valve dilations. There were no significant differences in the acute success rate of the procedures (100% vs. 95%), overall complication rate (56 vs. 57%), incidence of blood transfusions (44 vs. 30%), or major complications (11 vs. 13%) between the lower-birth-weight and comparison groups respectively. There was a trend towards higher survival rate in the comparison group in this small study population, but it did not reach significance (80 vs. 61%, P = 0.13). Conclusions: Cardiac catheterization in neonates <1,500 g is more likely to include percutaneous intervention, especially on the left side, but is generally successful with a complication rate similar to procedures performed in larger infants. Although these procedures are rare, improved miniaturization of equipment would facilitate safer interventions.

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