Cancer patients acceptance, understanding, and willingness-to-pay for pharmacogenomic testing

Sinead Cuffe, Henrique Hon, Xin Qiu, Kimberly Tobros, Chung Kwun Amy Wong, Bradley De Souza, Graham McFarlane, Sohaib Masroor, Abul K. Azad, Ekta Hasani, Natalie Rozanec, Natasha Leighl, Shabbir Alibhai, Wei Xu, Amalia M. Issa, Geoffrey Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pharmacogenomics is gaining increasing importance in the therapeutics of cancer; yet, there is little knowledge of cancer patients' attitudes toward the use of pharmacogenomic testing in clinical practice. We carried out this study to explore cancer patients' acceptance, understanding, and willingness-to-pay for pharmacogenomic testing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A broad cross-section of gastrointestinal, lung, breast, and other cancer patients were interviewed in terms of their acceptance of pharmacogenomic testing using hypothetical time, efficacy, and toxicity trade-off and willingness-to-pay scenarios. RESULTS: Among the 96% of 123 adjuvant patients accepting chemotherapy under optimal conditions, 99% wanted pharmacogenomic testing that could identify a subset of patients benefiting from chemotherapy, accepting median incurred costs of $2000 (range $0-25000) and turnaround time for test results of 16 days (range 0-90 days). Among the 97% of 121 metastatic patients accepting chemotherapy, 97.4% wanted pharmacogenomic testing that could detect the risk of severe toxicity, accepting median incurred costs of $1000 (range $0-10000) and turnaround time for results of 14 days (range 1-90 days). The majority of patients wanted to be involved in decision-making on pharmacogenomic testing; however, one in five patients lacked a basic understanding of pharmacogenomic testing. CONCLUSION: Among cancer patients willing to undergo chemotherapy, almost all wanted pharmacogenomic testing and were willing-to-pay for it, waiting several weeks for results. Although patients had a strong desire to be involved in decision-making on pharmacogenomic testing, a considerable proportion lacked the necessary knowledge to make informed choices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348-355
Number of pages8
JournalPharmacogenetics and Genomics
Volume24
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • patient preference
  • personalised medicine
  • pharmacogenomics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Genetics(clinical)

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