Can whole brain nerve conduction velocity be derived from surface-recorded visual evoked potentials? A re-examination of Reed, Vernon, and Johnson (2004)

Dave Saint-Amour, Clifford D. Saron, Charles E. Schroeder, John J. Foxe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Reed, Vernon, and Johnson [Reed, T. E., Vernon, P. A., & Johnson, A. M. (2004). Sex difference in brain nerve conduction velocity in normal humans. Neuropsychologia, 42, 1709-1714] reported that "nerve conduction velocity" (NCV) of visual transmission from retina to the primary visual area (V1) is significantly faster in males than females. The authors estimated the NCV by dividing head length (nasion-to-inion distance) by the latency of the well-known P100 component of the visual evoked potential (VEP). Here, we critically examine these metrics and we contend that knowledge of the underlying physiology of neural transmission across the initial stages of the visual processing hierarchy dictates that a number of their assumptions cannot be reasonably upheld. Alternative, and we believe, more parsimonious interpretations of the data are also proposed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1838-1844
Number of pages7
JournalNeuropsychologia
Volume43
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 16 2005

Keywords

  • Gender
  • Human
  • Neural transmission
  • Reaction time
  • Timing
  • Visual evoked potential

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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