Business travel-associated illness: A GeoSentinel analysis

For the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Analysis of a large cohort of business travelers will help clinicians focus on frequent and serious illnesses. We aimed to describe travel-related health problems in business travelers. Methods: GeoSentinel Surveillance Network consists of 64 travel and tropical medicine clinics in 29 countries; descriptive analysis was performed on ill business travelers, defined as persons traveling for work, evaluated after international travel 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2014. Results: Among 12 203 business travelers seen 1997-2014 (14 045 eligible diagnoses), the majority (97%) were adults aged 20-64 years; most (74%) reported from Western Europe or North America; two-thirds were male. Most (86%) were outpatients. Fewer than half (45%) reported a pre-travel healthcare encounter. Frequent regions of exposure were sub-Saharan Africa (37%), Southeast Asia (15%) and South Central Asia (14%). The most frequent diagnoses were malaria (9%), acute unspecified diarrhea (8%), viral syndrome (6%), acute bacterial diarrhea (5%) and chronic diarrhea (4%). Species was reported for 973 (90%) of 1079 patients with malaria, predominantly Plasmodium falciparum acquired in sub-Saharan Africa. Of 584 (54%) with malaria chemoprophylaxis information, 92% took none or incomplete courses. Thirteen deaths were reported, over half of which were due to malaria; others succumbed to pneumonia, typhoid fever, rabies, melioidosis and pyogenic abscess. Conclusions: Diarrheal illness was a major cause of morbidity. Malaria contributed substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly among business travelers to sub-Saharan Africa. Underuse or non-use of chemoprophylaxis contributed to malaria cases. Deaths in business travelers could be reduced by improving adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis and targeted vaccination for vaccine-preventable diseases. Pre-travel advice is indicated for business travelers and is currently under-utilized and needs improvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbertax097
JournalJournal of Travel Medicine
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Malaria
Africa South of the Sahara
Chemoprevention
Diarrhea
Travel Medicine
Central Asia
Melioidosis
Morbidity
Tropical Medicine
Southeastern Asia
Rabies
Falciparum Malaria
Typhoid Fever
North America
Abscess
Pneumonia
Vaccination
Outpatients
Vaccines
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Business
  • Death
  • Diarrhea
  • Malaria
  • Occupational medicine
  • Travel
  • Vaccine-preventable disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Business travel-associated illness : A GeoSentinel analysis. / For the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network.

In: Journal of Travel Medicine, Vol. 25, No. 1, tax097, 01.02.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

For the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network. / Business travel-associated illness : A GeoSentinel analysis. In: Journal of Travel Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 25, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: Analysis of a large cohort of business travelers will help clinicians focus on frequent and serious illnesses. We aimed to describe travel-related health problems in business travelers. Methods: GeoSentinel Surveillance Network consists of 64 travel and tropical medicine clinics in 29 countries; descriptive analysis was performed on ill business travelers, defined as persons traveling for work, evaluated after international travel 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2014. Results: Among 12 203 business travelers seen 1997-2014 (14 045 eligible diagnoses), the majority (97{\%}) were adults aged 20-64 years; most (74{\%}) reported from Western Europe or North America; two-thirds were male. Most (86{\%}) were outpatients. Fewer than half (45{\%}) reported a pre-travel healthcare encounter. Frequent regions of exposure were sub-Saharan Africa (37{\%}), Southeast Asia (15{\%}) and South Central Asia (14{\%}). The most frequent diagnoses were malaria (9{\%}), acute unspecified diarrhea (8{\%}), viral syndrome (6{\%}), acute bacterial diarrhea (5{\%}) and chronic diarrhea (4{\%}). Species was reported for 973 (90{\%}) of 1079 patients with malaria, predominantly Plasmodium falciparum acquired in sub-Saharan Africa. Of 584 (54{\%}) with malaria chemoprophylaxis information, 92{\%} took none or incomplete courses. Thirteen deaths were reported, over half of which were due to malaria; others succumbed to pneumonia, typhoid fever, rabies, melioidosis and pyogenic abscess. Conclusions: Diarrheal illness was a major cause of morbidity. Malaria contributed substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly among business travelers to sub-Saharan Africa. Underuse or non-use of chemoprophylaxis contributed to malaria cases. Deaths in business travelers could be reduced by improving adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis and targeted vaccination for vaccine-preventable diseases. Pre-travel advice is indicated for business travelers and is currently under-utilized and needs improvement.",
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AU - For the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network

AU - Chen, Lin H.

AU - Leder, Karin

AU - Barbre, Kira A.

AU - Schlagenhauf, Patricia

AU - Libman, Michael

AU - Keystone, Jay

AU - Mendelson, Marc

AU - Gautret, Philippe

AU - Schwartz, Eli

AU - Shaw, Marc

AU - MacDonald, Sue

AU - McCarthy, Anne

AU - Connor, Bradley A.

AU - Esposito, Douglas H.

AU - Hamer, Davidson

AU - Wilson, Mary E.

AU - von Sonnenburg, Frank

AU - Rothe, Camilla

AU - Kain, Kevin

AU - Boggild, Andrea

AU - Cramer, Jakob

AU - Jordan, Sabine

AU - Vinnemeier, Christof

AU - Yansouni, Cedric

AU - Chappuis, Francois

AU - Caumes, Eric

AU - Perignon, Alice

AU - Torresi, Joe

AU - Kanagawa, Shuzo

AU - Kato, Yasuyuki

AU - Grobusch, Martin

AU - Goorhuis, Bram

AU - Javelle, Emilie

AU - Kozarsky, Phyllis

AU - Wu, Henry

AU - Yoshimura, Yukiriro

AU - Tachikawa, Natsuo

AU - Lim, Poh Lian

AU - Piyaphanee, Watcharapong

AU - Silachamroon, Udomsak

AU - Murphy, Holly

AU - Pandey, Prativa

AU - Ásgeirsson, Hilmir

AU - Glans, Hedvig

AU - Jensenius, Mogens

AU - Borwein, Sarah

AU - Hale, Devon

AU - Leung, Daniel

AU - Benson, Scott

AU - Coyle, Christina M.

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N2 - Background: Analysis of a large cohort of business travelers will help clinicians focus on frequent and serious illnesses. We aimed to describe travel-related health problems in business travelers. Methods: GeoSentinel Surveillance Network consists of 64 travel and tropical medicine clinics in 29 countries; descriptive analysis was performed on ill business travelers, defined as persons traveling for work, evaluated after international travel 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2014. Results: Among 12 203 business travelers seen 1997-2014 (14 045 eligible diagnoses), the majority (97%) were adults aged 20-64 years; most (74%) reported from Western Europe or North America; two-thirds were male. Most (86%) were outpatients. Fewer than half (45%) reported a pre-travel healthcare encounter. Frequent regions of exposure were sub-Saharan Africa (37%), Southeast Asia (15%) and South Central Asia (14%). The most frequent diagnoses were malaria (9%), acute unspecified diarrhea (8%), viral syndrome (6%), acute bacterial diarrhea (5%) and chronic diarrhea (4%). Species was reported for 973 (90%) of 1079 patients with malaria, predominantly Plasmodium falciparum acquired in sub-Saharan Africa. Of 584 (54%) with malaria chemoprophylaxis information, 92% took none or incomplete courses. Thirteen deaths were reported, over half of which were due to malaria; others succumbed to pneumonia, typhoid fever, rabies, melioidosis and pyogenic abscess. Conclusions: Diarrheal illness was a major cause of morbidity. Malaria contributed substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly among business travelers to sub-Saharan Africa. Underuse or non-use of chemoprophylaxis contributed to malaria cases. Deaths in business travelers could be reduced by improving adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis and targeted vaccination for vaccine-preventable diseases. Pre-travel advice is indicated for business travelers and is currently under-utilized and needs improvement.

AB - Background: Analysis of a large cohort of business travelers will help clinicians focus on frequent and serious illnesses. We aimed to describe travel-related health problems in business travelers. Methods: GeoSentinel Surveillance Network consists of 64 travel and tropical medicine clinics in 29 countries; descriptive analysis was performed on ill business travelers, defined as persons traveling for work, evaluated after international travel 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2014. Results: Among 12 203 business travelers seen 1997-2014 (14 045 eligible diagnoses), the majority (97%) were adults aged 20-64 years; most (74%) reported from Western Europe or North America; two-thirds were male. Most (86%) were outpatients. Fewer than half (45%) reported a pre-travel healthcare encounter. Frequent regions of exposure were sub-Saharan Africa (37%), Southeast Asia (15%) and South Central Asia (14%). The most frequent diagnoses were malaria (9%), acute unspecified diarrhea (8%), viral syndrome (6%), acute bacterial diarrhea (5%) and chronic diarrhea (4%). Species was reported for 973 (90%) of 1079 patients with malaria, predominantly Plasmodium falciparum acquired in sub-Saharan Africa. Of 584 (54%) with malaria chemoprophylaxis information, 92% took none or incomplete courses. Thirteen deaths were reported, over half of which were due to malaria; others succumbed to pneumonia, typhoid fever, rabies, melioidosis and pyogenic abscess. Conclusions: Diarrheal illness was a major cause of morbidity. Malaria contributed substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly among business travelers to sub-Saharan Africa. Underuse or non-use of chemoprophylaxis contributed to malaria cases. Deaths in business travelers could be reduced by improving adherence to malaria chemoprophylaxis and targeted vaccination for vaccine-preventable diseases. Pre-travel advice is indicated for business travelers and is currently under-utilized and needs improvement.

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KW - Death

KW - Diarrhea

KW - Malaria

KW - Occupational medicine

KW - Travel

KW - Vaccine-preventable disease

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