Burden of prematurity-associated recurrent wheezing: caregiver missed work in the D-Wheeze trial

Lauren Ledingham, Curtis Tatsuoka, Nori Minich, Kristie R. Ross, Leigh Ann Kerns, Carol L. Wagner, Mamta Fuloria, Sharon Groh-Wargo, Teresa Zimmerman, Anna Maria Hibbs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: This study describes the burden of prematurity-associated wheezing in black infants with respect to caregiver missed work. Study design: We analyzed data from the D-Wheeze trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01601847). Black infants between 28–0/7 to 36–6/7 weeks’ gestational age at birth receiving <28 days of supplemental oxygen were enrolled. The primary outcome was missed work to care for the infant in the first year. Results: 147/277 (53.1%) infants had caregivers who reported time off. In an adjusted model, vitamin D supplementation (OR 0.52 [95% CI 0.30–0.89]; P = 0.018), recurrent wheeze (OR 2.26 [95% CI, 1.15–4.44]; P = 0.018), and other children in the household <5 years old (OR 0.45 [95% CI 0.26–0.78]; P = 0.004) were significantly associated with caregiver missed work. Conclusions: Black premature infants had a significant burden of caregiver missed work, emphasizing the impact of prematurity-associated wheezing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)69-76
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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