Brain event-related potential correlates of overfocused attention in obsessive-compulsive disorder

J. P. Towey, C. E. Tenke, G. E. Bruder, P. Leite, D. Friedman, M. Liebowitz, Eric Hollander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A hypothesis of overfocused attention in obsessive-compulsive disorder was investigated by measuring auditory event-related potentials (ERPs) during a selective attention task. Unmedicated patients (n = 18) with this disorder showed significantly larger attention-related processing negativity (PN), with earlier onset and longer duration, than did normal controls (n = 15). In the N200 region (160-250 ms), PN was larger in patients with fewer nonspecific neurological soft signs. This task, however, did not yield any group differences in mismatch negativity (N2a) or classical N200 (N2b). P300 amplitudes for attended targets were smaller for patient than normal groups, but the reverse was true for P300 and positive slow wave amplitudes for unattended nontargets. Collectively, these ERP abnormalities suggest a misallocation of cognitive resources. Because of the importance of the frontal lobe in the control of selective attention, PN enhancement in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder may reflect hyperactivation of this region. This conceptualization is consistent with recent functional neuroimaging findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)535-543
Number of pages9
JournalPsychophysiology
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Evoked Potentials
Brain
Functional Neuroimaging
Frontal Lobe

Keywords

  • Event-related potentials
  • N200
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • Overfocused attention
  • P300
  • Processing negativity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Brain event-related potential correlates of overfocused attention in obsessive-compulsive disorder. / Towey, J. P.; Tenke, C. E.; Bruder, G. E.; Leite, P.; Friedman, D.; Liebowitz, M.; Hollander, Eric.

In: Psychophysiology, Vol. 31, No. 6, 1994, p. 535-543.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Towey, J. P. ; Tenke, C. E. ; Bruder, G. E. ; Leite, P. ; Friedman, D. ; Liebowitz, M. ; Hollander, Eric. / Brain event-related potential correlates of overfocused attention in obsessive-compulsive disorder. In: Psychophysiology. 1994 ; Vol. 31, No. 6. pp. 535-543.
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