Bone density and microarchitecture in hepatitis C and HIV-coinfected postmenopausal minority women

M. T. Yin, A. RoyChoudhury, K. Nishiyama, T. Lang, J. Shah, S. Olender, D. C. Ferris, C. Zeana, Anjali Sharma, Barry S. Zingman, M. Bucovsky, I. Colon, E. Shane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Summary: We found that HIV+/HCV+ women had 7–8% lower areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the spine, hip, and radius (p < 0.01) and 5–7% lower volumetric BMD (vBMD) by central quantitative computed tomography (cQCT) at the spine and hip (p < 0.05). These data suggest that true deficits in vBMD may contribute to bone fragility and excess fractures reported in HIV+/HCV+ women. Introduction: aBMD by DXA is lower in persons coinfected with HIV and HCV (HIV+/HCV+) than with HIV monoinfection (HIV+). However, weight is often also lower with HCV infection, and measurement of aBMD by DXA can be confounded by adiposity; we aimed to determine whether true vBMD is also lower in HIV+/HCV+ coinfection. Methods: We measured aBMD of the lumbar spine (LS), total hip (TH), femoral neck (FN), and ultradistal radius (UDR) by DXA and vBMD of the spine and hip by cQCT and of the distal radius and tibia by high-resolution peripheral QCT (HRpQCT) in 37 HIV+/HCV+ and 119 HIV+ postmenopausal women. Groups were compared using Student’s t tests with covariate adjustment by multiple regression analysis. Results: HIV+/HCV+ and HIV+ women were of similar age and race/ethnicity. HIV+/HCV+ women had lower body mass index (BMI) and trunk fat and were more likely to smoke and less likely to have a history of AIDS. In HIV+/HCV+ women, aBMD by DXA was 7–8% lower at the LS, TH, and UDR (p < 0.01). Similarly, vBMD by cQCT was 5–7% lower at the LS and TH (p < 0.05). Between-group differences in LS aBMD and vBMD remained significant after adjustment for BMI, smoking, and AIDS history. Tibial total vBMD by HRpQCT was 10% lower in HIV+/HCV+ women. Conclusion: HIV+/HCV+ postmenopausal women had significantly lower spine aBMD and vBMD. These deficits in vBMD may contribute to bone fragility and excess fractures reported in HIV+/HCV+ women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)871-879
Number of pages9
JournalOsteoporosis International
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

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Hepatitis C
Bone Density
HIV
Spine
Hip
X-Rays
Tomography
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Body Mass Index
Social Adjustment
Bone and Bones
Femur Neck
Adiposity
Tibia
Coinfection
Smoke

Keywords

  • Bone density
  • Hepatitis C infection
  • HIV infection
  • Quantitative CT

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

T. Yin, M., RoyChoudhury, A., Nishiyama, K., Lang, T., Shah, J., Olender, S., ... Shane, E. (2018). Bone density and microarchitecture in hepatitis C and HIV-coinfected postmenopausal minority women. Osteoporosis International, 29(4), 871-879. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00198-017-4354-z

Bone density and microarchitecture in hepatitis C and HIV-coinfected postmenopausal minority women. / T. Yin, M.; RoyChoudhury, A.; Nishiyama, K.; Lang, T.; Shah, J.; Olender, S.; Ferris, D. C.; Zeana, C.; Sharma, Anjali; Zingman, Barry S.; Bucovsky, M.; Colon, I.; Shane, E.

In: Osteoporosis International, Vol. 29, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 871-879.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

T. Yin, M, RoyChoudhury, A, Nishiyama, K, Lang, T, Shah, J, Olender, S, Ferris, DC, Zeana, C, Sharma, A, Zingman, BS, Bucovsky, M, Colon, I & Shane, E 2018, 'Bone density and microarchitecture in hepatitis C and HIV-coinfected postmenopausal minority women', Osteoporosis International, vol. 29, no. 4, pp. 871-879. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00198-017-4354-z
T. Yin, M. ; RoyChoudhury, A. ; Nishiyama, K. ; Lang, T. ; Shah, J. ; Olender, S. ; Ferris, D. C. ; Zeana, C. ; Sharma, Anjali ; Zingman, Barry S. ; Bucovsky, M. ; Colon, I. ; Shane, E. / Bone density and microarchitecture in hepatitis C and HIV-coinfected postmenopausal minority women. In: Osteoporosis International. 2018 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 871-879.
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AU - T. Yin, M.

AU - RoyChoudhury, A.

AU - Nishiyama, K.

AU - Lang, T.

AU - Shah, J.

AU - Olender, S.

AU - Ferris, D. C.

AU - Zeana, C.

AU - Sharma, Anjali

AU - Zingman, Barry S.

AU - Bucovsky, M.

AU - Colon, I.

AU - Shane, E.

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N2 - Summary: We found that HIV+/HCV+ women had 7–8% lower areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the spine, hip, and radius (p < 0.01) and 5–7% lower volumetric BMD (vBMD) by central quantitative computed tomography (cQCT) at the spine and hip (p < 0.05). These data suggest that true deficits in vBMD may contribute to bone fragility and excess fractures reported in HIV+/HCV+ women. Introduction: aBMD by DXA is lower in persons coinfected with HIV and HCV (HIV+/HCV+) than with HIV monoinfection (HIV+). However, weight is often also lower with HCV infection, and measurement of aBMD by DXA can be confounded by adiposity; we aimed to determine whether true vBMD is also lower in HIV+/HCV+ coinfection. Methods: We measured aBMD of the lumbar spine (LS), total hip (TH), femoral neck (FN), and ultradistal radius (UDR) by DXA and vBMD of the spine and hip by cQCT and of the distal radius and tibia by high-resolution peripheral QCT (HRpQCT) in 37 HIV+/HCV+ and 119 HIV+ postmenopausal women. Groups were compared using Student’s t tests with covariate adjustment by multiple regression analysis. Results: HIV+/HCV+ and HIV+ women were of similar age and race/ethnicity. HIV+/HCV+ women had lower body mass index (BMI) and trunk fat and were more likely to smoke and less likely to have a history of AIDS. In HIV+/HCV+ women, aBMD by DXA was 7–8% lower at the LS, TH, and UDR (p < 0.01). Similarly, vBMD by cQCT was 5–7% lower at the LS and TH (p < 0.05). Between-group differences in LS aBMD and vBMD remained significant after adjustment for BMI, smoking, and AIDS history. Tibial total vBMD by HRpQCT was 10% lower in HIV+/HCV+ women. Conclusion: HIV+/HCV+ postmenopausal women had significantly lower spine aBMD and vBMD. These deficits in vBMD may contribute to bone fragility and excess fractures reported in HIV+/HCV+ women.

AB - Summary: We found that HIV+/HCV+ women had 7–8% lower areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at the spine, hip, and radius (p < 0.01) and 5–7% lower volumetric BMD (vBMD) by central quantitative computed tomography (cQCT) at the spine and hip (p < 0.05). These data suggest that true deficits in vBMD may contribute to bone fragility and excess fractures reported in HIV+/HCV+ women. Introduction: aBMD by DXA is lower in persons coinfected with HIV and HCV (HIV+/HCV+) than with HIV monoinfection (HIV+). However, weight is often also lower with HCV infection, and measurement of aBMD by DXA can be confounded by adiposity; we aimed to determine whether true vBMD is also lower in HIV+/HCV+ coinfection. Methods: We measured aBMD of the lumbar spine (LS), total hip (TH), femoral neck (FN), and ultradistal radius (UDR) by DXA and vBMD of the spine and hip by cQCT and of the distal radius and tibia by high-resolution peripheral QCT (HRpQCT) in 37 HIV+/HCV+ and 119 HIV+ postmenopausal women. Groups were compared using Student’s t tests with covariate adjustment by multiple regression analysis. Results: HIV+/HCV+ and HIV+ women were of similar age and race/ethnicity. HIV+/HCV+ women had lower body mass index (BMI) and trunk fat and were more likely to smoke and less likely to have a history of AIDS. In HIV+/HCV+ women, aBMD by DXA was 7–8% lower at the LS, TH, and UDR (p < 0.01). Similarly, vBMD by cQCT was 5–7% lower at the LS and TH (p < 0.05). Between-group differences in LS aBMD and vBMD remained significant after adjustment for BMI, smoking, and AIDS history. Tibial total vBMD by HRpQCT was 10% lower in HIV+/HCV+ women. Conclusion: HIV+/HCV+ postmenopausal women had significantly lower spine aBMD and vBMD. These deficits in vBMD may contribute to bone fragility and excess fractures reported in HIV+/HCV+ women.

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KW - Hepatitis C infection

KW - HIV infection

KW - Quantitative CT

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