Blood Loss and Transfusion Rates Following Patellofemoral Arthroplasty

Jonathan Courtney, David Liebelt, Michael P. Nett, Fred D. Cushner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patellofemoral arthroplasty (PFA) is a viable treatment option of the patient with isolated patellofemoral arthritis. Some of the purported advantages of PFA compared with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) include less invasive approach, less bone resection and tissue destruction, decreased operative time, shorter rehabilitation, better knee kinematics, and decreased blood loss. This study compared the blood loss associated with PFA with that of a cohort of patients with TKA. A proposed benefit of partial knee arthroplasty is less blood loss. Patellofemoral replacement seems not to have this benefit and blood loss prevention initiatives similar to those of TKA should be maintained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalOrthopedic Clinics of North America
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Blood Transfusion
Arthroplasty
Operative Time
Biomechanical Phenomena
Arthritis
Knee
Rehabilitation
Bone and Bones
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Blood loss
  • Patellofemoral arthroplasty
  • Total knee arthroplasty
  • Transfusion rates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Blood Loss and Transfusion Rates Following Patellofemoral Arthroplasty. / Courtney, Jonathan; Liebelt, David; Nett, Michael P.; Cushner, Fred D.

In: Orthopedic Clinics of North America, Vol. 43, No. 5, 11.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Courtney, Jonathan ; Liebelt, David ; Nett, Michael P. ; Cushner, Fred D. / Blood Loss and Transfusion Rates Following Patellofemoral Arthroplasty. In: Orthopedic Clinics of North America. 2012 ; Vol. 43, No. 5.
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