Blastulation rates decline in a linear fashion from euploid to aneuploid embryos with single versus multiple chromosomal errors

Mario Vega, Andrzej Breborowicz, Erin L. Moshier, Peter G. McGovern, Martin D. Keltz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To test the hypothesis that the blastulation rate is higher in euploid embryos than in aneuploid embryos as assessed by cleavage-stage biopsy with array-comprehensive genomic hybridization (aCGH). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting University-affiliated institution. Patient(s) Forty-one patients with 48 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles and 385 embryos that underwent cleavage-stage preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) with aCGH at the Continuum Reproductive Center between January 2010 and September 2013. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) Probability of blastocyst and/or fully expanded or hatching blastocyst (FEHB) progression depending on number of chromosomal abnormalities. Result(s) Euploid embryos are twice as likely to progress to blastocyst and three times as likely to progress to FEHB than aneuploid embryos: 76% versus 37% and 56% versus 18%, respectively. For every additional chromosomal abnormality, the likelihood of progressing to the blastocyst stage decreases by 22% and the likelihood of progressing to FEHB decreases by 33%. Conclusion(s) Euploid embryos are far more likely than aneuploid embryos to progress to the blastocyst and FEHB stages. There is a linear decrease in probability of blastulation with the increasing number of chromosomal abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)394-398
Number of pages5
JournalFertility and sterility
Volume102
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

Keywords

  • Aneuploidy
  • PGS
  • assisted reproduction
  • embryo quality
  • preimplantation genetic screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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