Bile acids and cancer: Direct and environmental-dependent effects

Agostino Di Ciaula, David Q.H. Wang, Emilio Molina Molina, Raquel Lunardi Baccetto, Giuseppe Calamita, Vincenzo O. Palmieri, Piero Portincasa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bile acids (BAs) regulate the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, cholesterol and lipids but have also a key role as signaling molecules and in the modulation of epithelial cell proliferation, gene expression and metabolism. These homeostatic pathways, when disrupted, are able to promote local inflammation, systemic metabolic disorders and, ultimately, cancer. The effect of hydrophobic BAs, in particular, can be linked with cancer in several digestive (mainly oesophagus, stomach, liver, pancreas, biliary tract, colon) and extra- digestive organs (i.e. prostate, breast) through a complex series of mechanisms including direct oxidative stress with DNA damage, apoptosis, epigenetic factors regulating gene expression, reduced/increased expression of nuclear receptors (mainly farnesoid X receptor, FXR) and altered composition of gut microbiota, also acting as a common interface between environmental factors (including diet, lifestyle, exposure to toxics) and the molecular events promoting cancerogenesis. Primary prevention strategies (i.e. changes in dietary habits and lifestyle, reduced exposure to environmental toxics) mainly able to modulate gut microbiota and the epigenome, and the therapeutic use of hydrophilic BAs to counterbalance the negative effects of the more hydrophobic BAs might be, in the near future, part of useful tools for cancer prevention and management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S87-S105
JournalAnnals of Hepatology
Volume16
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

Bile Acids and Salts
Poisons
Life Style
Neoplasms
Gene Expression
Environmental Exposure
Biliary Tract
Therapeutic Uses
Feeding Behavior
Primary Prevention
Cytoplasmic and Nuclear Receptors
Epigenomics
Vitamins
Esophagus
DNA Damage
Prostate
Pancreas
Stomach
Colon
Oxidative Stress

Keywords

  • Bile acids
  • Cancer
  • Environment
  • Epigenome
  • FXR
  • Microbiota

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Di Ciaula, A., Wang, D. Q. H., Molina, E. M., Baccetto, R. L., Calamita, G., Palmieri, V. O., & Portincasa, P. (2017). Bile acids and cancer: Direct and environmental-dependent effects. Annals of Hepatology, 16, S87-S105. https://doi.org/10.5604/01.3001.0010.5501

Bile acids and cancer : Direct and environmental-dependent effects. / Di Ciaula, Agostino; Wang, David Q.H.; Molina, Emilio Molina; Baccetto, Raquel Lunardi; Calamita, Giuseppe; Palmieri, Vincenzo O.; Portincasa, Piero.

In: Annals of Hepatology, Vol. 16, 01.11.2017, p. S87-S105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Di Ciaula, A, Wang, DQH, Molina, EM, Baccetto, RL, Calamita, G, Palmieri, VO & Portincasa, P 2017, 'Bile acids and cancer: Direct and environmental-dependent effects', Annals of Hepatology, vol. 16, pp. S87-S105. https://doi.org/10.5604/01.3001.0010.5501
Di Ciaula A, Wang DQH, Molina EM, Baccetto RL, Calamita G, Palmieri VO et al. Bile acids and cancer: Direct and environmental-dependent effects. Annals of Hepatology. 2017 Nov 1;16:S87-S105. https://doi.org/10.5604/01.3001.0010.5501
Di Ciaula, Agostino ; Wang, David Q.H. ; Molina, Emilio Molina ; Baccetto, Raquel Lunardi ; Calamita, Giuseppe ; Palmieri, Vincenzo O. ; Portincasa, Piero. / Bile acids and cancer : Direct and environmental-dependent effects. In: Annals of Hepatology. 2017 ; Vol. 16. pp. S87-S105.
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